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andygraybeal
01-01-2013, 09:12 AM
Is anyone sanding down their Lodge Cast Iron to have a smooth surface like the old Wagners?

I've been contemplating this for a while now :) and I wonder what anyone thinks.

Andy

lowercasebill
01-01-2013, 09:44 AM
yes i have been .. the new lodge preseasoned surface is very rough almost porous in texture,. i sanded one for a friend and was seasoning it and kept getting little bubbles of steam coming out of the cast iron.not happy with the new stuff which i think is made in china? . i sanded all my new stuff and a few guys on the bge forum are doing so as well .

franzb69
01-01-2013, 10:01 AM
some folks say if you're patient enough (which i doubt anyone can wait out), it'll smooth down itself in continuous use.

ajhuff
01-01-2013, 10:08 AM
Lodge are still made in the US (their enameled ware is not). The pebbly texture is from the manufacturing process . I would think sanding would exceed my patience level but certainly can be done. I've not had any issues with my Lodge pans though as is

AJ

lowercasebill
01-01-2013, 10:58 AM
Lodge are still made in the US (their enameled ware is not). The pebbly texture is from the manufacturing process . I would think sanding would exceed my patience level but certainly can be done. I've not had any issues with my Lodge pans though as is

AJ

i have no issues with my old lodge but the new preseasoned surface is ? bubbley looking like plasma sprayed ? not a machined surface like the old stuff. sanding was easy with a random orbit sander, it took longer to re-season it..
and while i am that subject. i got a de buyer 12" mineral fry pan for Christmas :biggrin:... had no lard so i seasoned it with duck fat!

ajhuff
01-01-2013, 05:14 PM
Did you have any improvement with sanding?

I can't remember the dates if manufacturing change. I want to say the pre seasoning began around 2000 give or take a year. I know I bought one of the last unseasoned pans. Prior to seasoning, the pans are tumbled together and then again in a bed of river rock. It's this part of the process that results in the pebbly finish. Before that Chang in process, castings were shot blasted. I think the change from blasting to tumbling was in the mid 90s.

-AJ

bikehunter
01-01-2013, 05:51 PM
I contacted Lodge and was told that they stopped the machining/smoothing process. The machining is just too expensive to sell the pans at a reasonable price. . She said they would cost twice as much. For whatever that's worth. That said, I have one 8" skillet, bought within the last couple years. It has the pebbled finish and works just fine. Admittedly, I only use it for cornbread. I mix up a box of that quick cornbread, preheat a little oil in the oven, pour in the cornbread. It comes out of the pan slick as can be, without even running a knife around the edge. Barely leaves a crumb in the pan. That's everything I know about Lodge pans. ;-)

Lefty
01-01-2013, 06:03 PM
Lodge are still a quality pan. I got a 12" one, 3 years ago, from my wife and it's a solid and very nice piece to use. Sanding it down will defintely improve performance, but if you aren't using it for eggs isn't a necessity. I look at it in the same vein rounding the spine and choil on a well priced knife with great performance, but less than stellar f and f. It doesn't take that long and will make using it that much nicer. Not necessary, but definitely worth the little effort to take a very good piece and make it great.

bikehunter
01-01-2013, 11:15 PM
Sanding it down will defintely improve performance, but if you aren't using it for eggs isn't a necessity..... Not necessary, but definitely worth the little effort to take a very good piece and make it great.

Just for fun, since I was curious, and needed a little late lunch anyhow, I used my 8" Lodge cornbread pan and tried it with a couple of eggs, for a sandwich. Used a half teaspoon of butter and two eggs. They came out of that pan beautifully, without a trace of sticking. I found it just fine with no sanding. So much for the criticism of that pebbled finish.

franzb69
01-02-2013, 12:15 AM
always used my lodge for cornbread. always releases like a champ.

DwarvenChef
01-02-2013, 12:54 AM
After a couple weeks of daily use all my lodge pieces are just as user friendly as my vintage stuff. I find the fat used has more of an effect than the surface texture. I'm also rather happy to take the new lodges off peoples hands at yard sales for a couple bucks apeace :)

Lefty
01-02-2013, 01:12 AM
Bikehunter, that's great to read. I'm a fan of Lodge and that just makes them even more appealing to everyone else! :D

franzb69
01-02-2013, 01:25 AM
heard that lard works best on cast iron pans.

EdipisReks
01-02-2013, 11:46 AM
Just for fun, since I was curious, and needed a little late lunch anyhow, I used my 8" Lodge cornbread pan and tried it with a couple of eggs, for a sandwich. Used a half teaspoon of butter and two eggs. They came out of that pan beautifully, without a trace of sticking. I found it just fine with no sanding. So much for the criticism of that pebbled finish.

that would really depend on how you like your eggs, though.

bikehunter
01-02-2013, 01:20 PM
that would really depend on how you like your eggs, though.

For a sandwich I just break and spread the yolk with spatula, turn once and cook until just cooked through. If you like well done scrambled, sticking could be a problem, I suppose, but I don't care for overcooked eggs in any style.

kalaeb
01-02-2013, 01:28 PM
This may be slightly off topic, but has anyone tried the new Lodge steel pans. They have the same seasoning, but I wonder if a smooth finish would be better.

jmforge
01-02-2013, 04:15 PM
Crisco SHORTENING seems to work well too. Oil, not so great.
heard that lard works best on cast iron pans.

Dave Martell
01-02-2013, 05:28 PM
I've owned & used Lodge from 20yrs+ (ago) construction and loved this stuff even though it came not so well finished or as smooth as the vintage Erie, Griswold, & Wagner stuff did. A few years ago I decided to add some pieces to my collection and bought the new pre-seasoned stuff and can honestly say this stuff sucks in comparison to my older Lodge pans. For starters the pans are much rougher inside and grab hold of many food stuffs but the worst part is that the pre-seasoning seems to keep a more permanent seasoning from taking hold. I've sanded one pan to smooth and re-seasoned it and the new seasoning only takes on the high spots, where there is lows (voids in casting) the new seasoning flakes. I have 3 or 4 (I think 4) of these new pre-seasoned pans and I hate using them yet my older Lodge pans keep on trucking along. I should also mention that I've tried just about every trick in the book with seasoning the new pans and all fail. Funny thing is that the outsides of the new pans are super black and shiny though - they look better than my older pans do. :dontknow:

I'm buying vintage pans from now on.

Dave Martell
01-02-2013, 05:30 PM
I've owned & used Lodge from 20yrs+ (ago) construction and loved this stuff even though it came not so well finished or as smooth as the vintage Erie, Griswold, & Wagner stuff did. A few years ago I decided to add some pieces to my collection and bought the new pre-seasoned stuff and can honestly say this stuff sucks in comparison to my older Lodge pans. For starters the pans are much rougher inside and grab hold of many food stuffs but the worst part is that the pre-seasoning seems to keep a more permanent seasoning from taking hold. I've sanded one pan to smooth and re-seasoned it and the new seasoning only takes on the high spots, where there is lows (voids in casting) the new seasoning flakes. I have 3 or 4 (I think 4) of these new pre-seasoned pans and I hate using them yet my older Lodge pans keep on trucking along. I should also mention that I've tried just about every trick in the book with seasoning the new pans and all fail. Funny thing is that the outsides of the new pans are super black and shiny though - they look better than my older pans do. :dontknow:

I'm buying vintage pans from now on.


One exception is my pre-seasoned Lodge - that thing rocks - it seasoned black and smooth almost instantly - go figure?!

eshua
01-02-2013, 06:21 PM
Sounds like you all need some girlfriends that like to hit up auctions. I hate that **** but got myself a whole set of 100yr old wagner ware long after I got rid of which ever girl that was lol. 100 is just a guess by her..but still works great.

andygraybeal
01-02-2013, 06:56 PM
awesome~ thanks bros for the info. i might have to experiment myself. i'm glad that others have tried.

for the most part as long as i heat the pan properly and put enough fat in everything is great.. but i keep wondering if it would be better if i sanded atleast one of my lodge's down for a trial.

bikehunter
01-02-2013, 07:01 PM
heard that lard works best on cast iron pans.

Best for cooking or seasoning?

jmforge
01-02-2013, 08:52 PM
Best for cooking or seasoning?
C. All of the above? :lol2:

bikehunter
01-02-2013, 09:28 PM
I use bacon grease for seasoning and cooking....and sometimes butter.

franzb69
01-02-2013, 11:32 PM
C. All of the above?

afaik yep!

DwarvenChef
01-03-2013, 09:26 AM
Butter, bacon drippings, and duck fat out perform all other fats I have with peanut oil doing ok and olive oil causing the most sticking issues. I don't mind cooking in olive oil but have to really watch my heat to keep stuff from sticking.

ajhuff
03-07-2013, 09:28 PM
awesome~ thanks bros for the info. i might have to experiment myself. i'm glad that others have tried.

for the most part as long as i heat the pan properly and put enough fat in everything is great.. but i keep wondering if it would be better if i sanded atleast one of my lodge's down for a trial.

Did you ever try it?

-AJ

Basecadet
03-07-2013, 10:23 PM
I read this article (http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/) about seasoning with flaxseed oil a while ago. Has anyone tried this? I've been meaning to give it a shot but I have a Griswold and a Lodge that I like the seasoning on and I cant bring myself to strip them and start over.

boomchakabowwow
03-08-2013, 11:53 AM
I read this article (http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/) about seasoning with flaxseed oil a while ago. Has anyone tried this? I've been meaning to give it a shot but I have a Griswold and a Lodge that I like the seasoning on and I cant bring myself to strip them and start over.

^^THIS!

my wife loves me and bought me a bottle of expensive flaxseed oil TO EAT! i used it on my new to me griswold. it works too well. you have to wipe on the thinnest coat and probably let it heat up with the pan upside down to allow it to drain. it will build up a thick coat if you dont. i went too thick and had to heat if off and start over.

i did it to all my older lodge pans before i gave them away. this is the best method ever..well the best after the "bacon everyday method".

ajhuff
03-08-2013, 12:09 PM
Lots of pseudo-science there though I have no doubt that the flax seed oil works well. I've always seasoned my pans on the gas grill around 600 degrees and that works well.

Ignore her page of black rust. Cast iron does not rust like steel does.

-AJ

wilburh
03-08-2013, 04:09 PM
I was on my way to a shootin' match in Florida and stopped at an antique shop in Dothan AL. They had two skillets that were onyx black and smooth as glass on the interior. I silently remarked to myself, checked the price and passed. They were 60 bucks each which was much higher than a new skillet. Soooo.....I left and about 20 miles down the road it hit me that it would take a lifetime to get a skillet seasoned to that extent. Stopped on the way home and they were GONE!!!

This incident will plague my thoughts till the very end....

Cornbread from a box???....just sayin':bigeek: