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Thread: A high-end no-fuss knife - contradiction in terms?

  1. #21
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    I've been in the world of high end folders but have recently started sharpening my new interest of kitchen knives. Since I'm somewhat lazy at sharpening I use an Edge Pro to set the primary bevel at <30 degrees inclusive and then touch up at 30 degrees for a small micro bevel. Seems to work for my daily home cooking chores. Not much work and will still push-cut a soft tomato depending on the knife grind (not the edge finishing).

  2. #22
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    El Pescador's Avatar
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    Maybe you learn to strop and send off the knife to be sharpened by Dave or Jon.
    "So you want to be a vegetarian? Hitler was a vegetarian and look at how he turned out."

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    I am surprised at this.
    Well, I've thought about it but no. No axes, yet. I do have an ax but I've probably used it twice in my life. With regard to the OP's question, if you are going to go the way of waterstone sharpening, you really have a ton of options. If you are okay with wa-handles, I would second Heiji semistainless or Gengetsu "stainless." The Mario suggestion would also be a good choice. For westerns I might choose a Gesshin Kagero or Blazen.

    The CarboNEXT is among the best bang for the buck lower cost knives but not in the same class as the knives I and others just listed. It does stain and turns a blotchy, dull, gray color, if that matters to you.

  4. #24
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    Im sorry that you wont be going with a Takeda Large cleaver as your first chefs knife Welcome to the forum!

  5. #25
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
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    You might want to consider a different sharpening system that is a little more versatile than the machines, but much simpler than learning wetstones.
    I've never used either one, but I'm sure someone else can comment on their effectiveness.

    This is very simple, but also cheap enough to try: http://epicedge.com/shopexd.asp?id=86677

    The Edgepro is well regarded, but more expensive: http://epicedge.com/shopdisplayprodu...pening+Systems

    ETA: These links are just the first ones that came to mind to show you the alternatives, there are other places to find these, although epicedge is a very reputable store.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I admit, I have never actually sharpened an ax.)
    Funny enough, I'm in the process of sharpening and old axe that a friend wanted me to mess with. It literally was the dullest most red-rusted piece of steel that I have ever seen in my life...but I thought it would be fun to try by hand (don't own a belt sander).

    Used my dremel to remove all the rust, but sharpening was a different story...could not do it like a knife with the stone stable and holding the axe in my hands -- instead, it was easier to stabilize the axe and rub stones (i.e. Takeda's way) onto the edge in a rounding fashion to go with the convexity of the blade.

    On a scale from 0-10, this thing was a 0.5 to start off in both looks and cutting ability. But now I would say it looks like a 5, and although I'm not completely done...I feel it will cut like a 7 (relatively speaking of course).

    I wouldn't want to do this again, but it was fun to experiment.

  7. #27
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    Most axes are first sharpened with a file, then edge is refined with a sone if needed. The steel isn't all that hard.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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  8. #28
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    Most axes are first sharpened with a file, then edge is refined with a sone if needed. The steel isn't all that hard.
    yep, though traditional Scandinavian axes are quite hard, and took a while even with good files.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgraeff View Post
    Mario stainless custom
    I've been able to find most of the things people are mentioning here by Google, but this time I just get Mario Batali knife links, which I strongly suspect isn't what you mean.

    Link?

  10. #30
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkozlows View Post
    I've been able to find most of the things people are mentioning here by Google, but this time I just get Mario Batali knife links, which I strongly suspect isn't what you mean.

    Link?
    I don't know that he has a website, but he is a vendor here with his own subforum:

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/fo...goglia-Cutlery

    You can see pictures of his work here, and send him a PM if interested in commissioning something (username is "RRLOVER").

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