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Thread: Straightening Block/Stick

  1. #11
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    The best version I made was from an oak dowel I scored for like $4 at Home Depot that I cut a notch into. Trust me folks - low tech works here.


    Here's a pimped out low tech dowel version I made once, I gave it away to someone.
    Was that the one you used in your sharpening DVD?

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  2. #12
    No, I would make one similar to Dave's. One straight and one diagonal cut. If you want more, I will have to charge you $55. Kidding, of course.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    Was that the one you used in your sharpening DVD?

    k.

    Probably not, I had first made this monster version from a 2x2 and that's likely the one I showed in the DVD but I forget really. I still have the monster version hanging on the wall and it gets used a lot still but I need to make a smaller broom handle version again since they're more agile and useful really.

  4. #14
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    Here's some pics and measurements for anyone who wants to DIY:

    Overall length is 395mm (~16 inches)
    Width is 28mm, height is 54mm.

    The 45 degree slots start 73mm from the end and are 14mm wide by 36mm deep. They end 118mm from the end.

    The 90 degree slot starts 170mm from the end and is 7mm wide by 36mm deep








  5. #15
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    Thanks for the specs/pics.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  6. #16
    So i hate to be "that guy", but i just have a few things to say about this subject. I've used various devices to straighten blades at this point, and although some may be functional, there are subtle things about the ones used in Japan that pretty much every other one misses. Likewise, you would be doing yourself a disservice by making one too thin or too small (like out of a broomstick or dowel rod). The two types of slots are for different uses and areas and they do serve a purpose. However, the biggest things that bothers me about all of this is the number of blades people have tried to straighten that i've later had to fix. Theoretically its easy, but i see so many people mess it up. Be careful or have someone who has some experience/training do it for you. There is potential to cause cracks in your blade, cause stress points that later turn into cracks, chip the edge, break off the tip, break the blade in half, make your blade wavy, cause torsion, and so many other things.

  7. #17
    Jon, are there any videos or something of people using it that displays how it is superior, or perhaps some kind of in-depth description of how it is used? As with most thing Japanese, I would assume that what has become traditional standard is a time-tested tool that has been perfected, provided one has the training and skill to use it. I mean, there were broomsticks in Japan circa 1500, too! Is it the angles? Something else?

  8. #18
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    Jon, which is your tool of choice?

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Jon, are there any videos or something of people using it that displays how it is superior, or perhaps some kind of in-depth description of how it is used? As with most thing Japanese, I would assume that what has become traditional standard is a time-tested tool that has been perfected, provided one has the training and skill to use it. I mean, there were broomsticks in Japan circa 1500, too! Is it the angles? Something else?
    I dont know if there are videos or not to be honest. I use one that was given to my by the people i trained with. The thing is that even when you buy one new, there are things you do to it to make it work a bit better... gouge out this area, sand off that area, tape this, and so on. And a lot of that is stuff that you do to your own preference based on experience. In japan there are many versions of these too... which style you use depends on how you learned or who you learned from. The angles of the grooves and their thickness all come into play. You can straighten with things other than these of course... i'm not saying they wont work. I'm just saying trying to make one without really understanding how its used may not be the best idea.

    What i think is most important though is not the device itself, but the skill sets involved in straightening blades properly. I've lost count of the number of blades i've fixed that people had messed up trying to straighten themselves. I wish i could write something up about it, but i'm afraid a lot of the things involved dont type up well... or show up well in video for that matter. Maybe its something i should try to tackle in the near future.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    ...I've used various devices to straighten blades at this point, and although some may be functional, there are subtle things about the ones used in Japan that pretty much every other one misses. ...
    Jon, can you elaborate on this? Just curious. I was to make a couple for myself, but now you planted a seed of doubt in me. Opps, never mind.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

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