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Thread: 1.76 Million Dollar Bluefin

  1. #11
    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    I like Bluefin as much as the next person but even when I charter a 60' sportfisjerman just for two of us and drive to the OBX, including all incidentals and have a lousy catch I still don't think I go over $60 a pound for Yellowfin and Bigeye. A good trip is more like $15 #. Plus it's a lot more fun catching your own fish.
    Who you jivin' with that Cosmik Debris?

  2. #12
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    um..... um.... I can get some down the street just the same. Thx tho. Honestly something like this would be like being at times square for the ball drop. Doesn't sound fun, but when you tell people about it people will be in awe.
    Chewie's the man.

  3. #13
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckfat View Post
    Publicity stunt or not you really have to wonder where it all ends. To me it seems more like negative publicity then any thing positive.
    I should have said tradition (if that's even the right word) - it happens every year with the first fish sold at market. It's not really about the value of the actual fish. Can't remeber where I read that tho...
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by mpukas View Post
    I should have said tradition (if that's even the right word) - it happens every year with the first fish sold at market. It's not really about the value of the actual fish. Can't remeber where I read that tho...
    The article linked did not put it so bluntly but eluded to exactly that. The price does not necessarily reflect the quality of the fish and the winning bidder said he wanted to help boast Japan's economy. I'm sure it's small drops in the bucket but it is publicity for his stores and I'm sure the fisherman are happy. Said he did the same thing last year at the years first fish market so I'm sure we can expect more of it.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Mike L.'s Avatar
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    What is that the fellow is holding? Some sort of spatulate-bladed fish opener? Anybody know?
    Another day, another band aid.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by The hekler View Post
    the winning bidder said he wanted to help boast Japan's economy.
    Propably one could find 10 better ways of helping people in his country than spending over 8000 dollars per kilo of fish[so if you count waste that price could double].

    But makes me wonder actually, cant see recession in the industry?

  7. #17

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    I'm not sure how the fish are bought when they are caught near home waters, but the ones that are caught in places like Cape Cod are bought pretty much on the dock by Japanese buyers based on the quality of the fish meat. They have a tool that looks like a giant hypodermic needle that is used to take core samples of the fish so they can tell what the fat content is. They are then flash frozen and flown to Tokyo. A number of years ago, our former captain and his buddy got a 23 foot center console boat licensed up as a tuna boat and towed it up north to fish the Stellweggen Bank. They caught a fish that had a dockside weight of over 500 pounds and they Japanese buyer handed them $13,000 in cash. The expectation was that the fish would bring around triple that, $40k or so at the auction. Of course, at the time, the absolute auction record for a fish was somewhere around $100K for a 900 plus pounder Ior around $100 a pound carcass weight IRC. That fish supposedly sold for $300 a pound for the meat and about the same for a 3 oz portion of the good belly meat at a sushi joint in Tokyo. This "million dollar first fish" fad is apparently just that and fairly recent. The really scary part is that these last few super pricey fish have all been Pacific bluefin caught close to the home market and MUCH smaller than some of the Atlantic giants. Of course, being Japanese, they would probably tell you that the Japanese fish are better than the American, Canadian, French, Italian or Spanish Fish.
    Quote Originally Posted by The hekler View Post
    The article linked did not put it so bluntly but eluded to exactly that. The price does not necessarily reflect the quality of the fish and the winning bidder said he wanted to help boast Japan's economy. I'm sure it's small drops in the bucket but it is publicity for his stores and I'm sure the fisherman are happy. Said he did the same thing last year at the years first fish market so I'm sure we can expect more of it.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckfat View Post
    I like Bluefin as much as the next person but even when I charter a 60' sportfisjerman just for two of us and drive to the OBX, including all incidentals and have a lousy catch I still don't think I go over $60 a pound for Yellowfin and Bigeye. A good trip is more like $15 #. Plus it's a lot more fun catching your own fish.
    Thanks for the thread & video,This sale made the local Hawaii news,probably was aired in many other places as well.I saw on a show,think it was Nat. Geo. Wild, that because of the Japanese demand for Bluefin,they have been under pressure.Bluefin are mating with yellowfin & producing offspring.

    Charter boats have gotten very expensive,many have gone out of business on Oahu.The Kona coast on the big Island is still the main fleet in Hawaii.When the yellowfin run,many small trailered boats(we call them puddlejumpers)head out to sea,looking for piles of birds & a hookup.Dragging lures wt. Pen Senator or International reels.Rock & Roll seas in a small boat,high adventure

  9. #19

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    Keith, Kona has the advantage of not only all of the fish that people want to catch, but t is also one of the few places in the US along with South Florida where you can actually run a first rate charter operation with something as small as say a Bertram 31 or Merritt 37 because the fishing ground are so close in.

  10. #20
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    Yeh the days of the 50-60 foot wooden hulls is past.In Kona as you said deep water right off shore,Mauna Loa is so huge blocks alot of the tradewinds & can be realatively calm. at sea.

    Off the Waianae coast on Oahu,launching out of Pokai bay,more often than not you can be in rough seas.

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