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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    Diamond plate would eat metal from that kind of "softee" in no-time.
    Straight after you could use 800 grit.
    +1 on plate, an Atoma 140 or DMT XC, it can (should) also be used to flatten your other stones. Also maybe consider a Beston 500, cuts really fast and you could probably skip your 800 and jump right to 1200 after setting the bevel with the Beston.

  2. #12
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    I have only used my plate (atoma 140) to flatten stones so far. For blades, should it be used dry or with water?

  3. #13
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    btw, thanks to everyone for the advice. Really appreciate the info.

  4. #14

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    Looks like you are following the same path as me a few months ago! Congratulations on your new acquisitions, both equipment and skills.

    I've been doing a lot of sharpening of friends/neighbors knives just to get the time in on the stones. Of course, that means nearly everything I'm working on is both extremely beatup and low-end, stamped blades. But it's still good experience for locking in the muscle memory for how to hold the blades and the motions across the stones.

    Oddly, I've found these crappy knives to be about 2-5X as much work to sharpen as a decent knife. Some of that is the extent of the damage, but I think some of it is the nature of the tough/soft steels in most of these blades.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by crimedog72 View Post
    I have only used my plate (atoma 140) to flatten stones so far. For blades, should it be used dry or with water?
    Whether flattening stones or working on knives always wet!
    Fudoushin Bujinkan Dojo: http://fudoushin.com/

  6. #16
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    QUOTE=Zwiefel;171325]Looks like you are following the same path as me a few months ago! Congratulations on your new acquisitions, both equipment and skills.

    I've been doing a lot of sharpening of friends/neighbors knives just to get the time in on the stones. Of course, that means nearly everything I'm working on is both extremely beatup and low-end, stamped blades. But it's still good experience for locking in the muscle memory for how to hold the blades and the motions across the stones.

    Oddly, I've found these crappy knives to be about 2-5X as much work to sharpen as a decent knife. Some of that is the extent of the damage, but I think some of it is the nature of the tough/soft steels in most of these blades.[/QUOTE]

    I agree. It seems the cheap stamped knives are awful to sharpen and all that work goes to nothing as they dull quicken than they sharpen. Especially the really shiny ones. My mother has a stamped wusthof nakiri which won't sharpen freehand. Has to go to the belt grinder as even a 220 naniwa won't scratch it. For the op what I do is as others have mentioned. Cut a relief bevel with a course stone then raise the spine a hair on your 1200 and a couple strokes and you'll have a sharp and strong edge(must still experiment with angles for that knife). Then subsequent sharpenings will be done quickly till the relief needs to be ground again

  7. #17
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    It should only take a long time the first time around. You've just rounded your edges after a while. After you establish your new bevels, don't wait so long in between sharpenings and the burr will form pretty much immediately. If I were you, I'd just put in the time. Once you know how to sharpen, nothing improves your edges like a little muscle memory.

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