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Thread: Difference between Zwilling Four Star and Four Star II? (Buying advice)

  1. #11
    You won't find much love for knife sets on this forum, most of us here are a bit fanatical about having wickedly sharp knives that offer absolute performance. Not a strong suit for German style knives. There nothing wrong about German knives but they are designed for different use then what most is us here seek. Most of the knives talked about here are Japanese or at least Japanese style which offers a harder, higher quality steel that enables a knife to be thinner and have a much more acute edge which leads to better cutting performance. German steel tends to be softer, and the knives themselves are thicker not to mention have different profiles, this means they quickly dull although they are easier to sharpen and with a honing steel the edge can be brought back easier then a Japanese style knife in between sharpening. The reason you won't find much love for sets is that when you buy one you will notice you are using the same 2-3 knives all of the time and wondering why you bought the other 7. Of you post what you cook, how often what your priorities are I'm sure others will be able to direct your search towards other knives that will probably serve you better.

  2. #12
    I'm happy to see I've come to the right place! You guys are really serious about your cutlery! You all seem to agree japanese is the way to go, I knew their knives were sharper, but I also knew that they're more difficult to sharpen... that's why, being a novice and having never sharpened anything, I was looking into german knives (and the almost half price set looked like a good deal), but sooner or later I will have to learn how to use a stone, so why wait?! So here it is:

    What type of knife(s) do you think you want? Of course a chef knife or a santoku for most of the work, a pairing knife, maybe a serrated utility knife for things like cherry tomatoes and citrus fruit and a bread knife. I may also need a boning knife and a carving knife.

    Why is it being purchased? What, if anything, are you replacing? It's being purchased because I love cooking but never had a good knife to work with.

    What do you like and dislike about these qualities of your knives already? Well, everything, they're really ****** knives!
    Aesthetics-
    Edge Quality/Retention-
    Ease of Use-
    Comfort-

    What grip do you use? I use the pinch grip for most work.

    What kind of cutting motion do you use? Circular motion, slicing, chopping, depends what I'm doing.

    Where do you store them? I would have to buy a magnetic bar or a wood block.

    Have you ever oiled a handle? No

    What kind of cutting board(s) do you use? Bamboo mostly, wood and plastic.

    For edge maintenance, do you use a strop, honing rod, pull through/other, or nothing? Never sharpened anything, but I'm willing to learn!

    Have they ever been sharpened? No

    What is your budget? Around 250€ to start.

    What do you cook and how often? Mostly italian food, but I like to experiment a lot of dishes from all over the world. I cook every day.

    Special requests(Country of origin/type of wood/etc)? Only request is that they're obtainable in Italy.

    Thank you very much for your suggestions, my cutlery Senseis!

  3. #13
    For the last 12 years Zwilling knives are mainly manufactured in China or by Arcos in Spain. Only the management office is in Germany.

    For the same $$ you can purchase Wusthof Dreizack knives that are still made in Germany.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggg16902002 View Post
    For the last 12 years Zwilling knives are mainly manufactured in China or by Arcos in Spain. Only the management office is in Germany.

    For the same $$ you can purchase Wusthof Dreizack knives that are still made in Germany.
    J.A. Henckels International are made in Spain or China.
    Zwilling are still made in Solingen, Germany.

  5. #15
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    If you like henckels, check out miyabis at WS or SLT. You can get 15% discount if your in the industry, and they often run sales....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  6. #16
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NO ChoP! View Post
    If you like henckels, check out miyabis at WS or SLT. You can get 15% discount if your in the industry, and they often run sales....
    +1
    i think miyabis would be a good place to start. i much prefer them to shun classics. they have a newer line called "artisan" which seems to be a fairly good deal for sg2 steel. i would steer clear of their fusion line though,the ones i sharpened were way thick behind the edge. the artisan line has a better grind.

  7. #17
    As far as Miyabis go, I started off with the fusion as my first Japanese knife and liked it quite a bit. It's much nicer than the kaizen line in my opinion. My wife recently got an artisan Gyuto as her first J knife and it does indeed have better geometry than and of the other lines. It was heavily discounted when she got it, though I'm not sure if the sale is still going on.
    - Erik

  8. #18
    As an aside on the topic of 4-stars, the older design is better if you use a pinch grip. The 4-starII knives have that dumb endcap which pointlessly moves the balance point back. A classic case of design aimed at people who don't take their knifework seriously.
    - Erik

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