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  1. #41

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sambal View Post
    A bit of trivia: When you pop mustard seeds in hot ghee and immediately add this to a bowl of dhal (split pea) curry just before serving, it's called "chaunk", just like the sound it makes. The flavour and aroma is amazing! Do try a chaunk sometime.
    Interesting...I've never heard this word before...always heard this called a Tadka or Tarka, which is probably Hindi. What language is Chaunk?

    The only other word like this I know is Chatak...which is like the sounds you make when you eat something very tasty...I think that's a Hindi word.

    Talal, yup, I use this everytime when I make Moong Daal. One of my favorites.

    Here's some photos from a batch of Moong Daal a while back:
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...2669414&type=3
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Talal's Avatar
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    Fantastic looking .. ive never made dosas myself to be honest.. always enjoyed moong dal on a mountain of rice! but you have certainly inspired me to try it out!

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Sambal View Post
    Ghee is more commonly used in northern India, coconut oil more in the south. I think ghee is more popular than butter in India because it keeps rather well without refrigeration for quite a while. I have a tub in my fridge most of the time and use it when I cook northern Indian or moghul type curries like a korma or when I'm making Indian roti on the griddle. I love its nutty creaminess. Butter is a good substitute if you don't use it enough to warrant buying a tub or tin of it. In terms of brands I've found that those made in India from Indian milk and butter fats are superior. 'Amul' is great; 'QBB' which I think is made in India but from Australian milk and butter fats is not as aromatic or nutty in flavour. Dave, if you have a tin of it already try using it for omelettes, rich stews, etc. A good dollop of ghee in a hot pan with some mustard seeds or cumin seeds thrown in and quickly taken out (just as they pop!) to add on top of stews or soups can be surprisingly good!

    Thanks

  4. #44
    Dave I use Ghee when doing steaks in a pan. I make my own from 1 pound of unsalted butter. It isn't hard to do as I've listed the steps below, though it doesn't take a bit of time but makes the kitchen smell like buttered popcorn. The dog and cats love the foam by the way.

    How to Make Ghee


    use 4 sticks (or 1 lb.) of regular, unsalted butter.

    Melt the Butter
    Put all the butter into a pot, and cook it on a low heat. In a few minutes, the butter will melt, the foam will rise to the top, and bubbles will be bursting.

    Scoop the Foam From the Butter

    Once the foam appears, lower the heat to an even lower degree and scoop off the foam with a spoon.

    Continue to cook the butter on a low heat for about 5-20 minutes, or until the butter becomes very clear and the milk solids on the bottom become a light brown.

    Pour the Butter Through a Filter (coffee filters work good or fine cheese cloth)

    Now turn the heat off and let the pot stand for 2 minutes, allowing everything to settle before straining everything into a jar through a coffee filter or a cheese cloth.

    Once everything is in the jar, let it cool and solidify.

    Store the Ghee
    Your clarified butter is now ready and can be stored at room temperature for up to a year. You can now use it a as a dip for lobster sauce, an Indian food, or as a substitute for any recipe at all that calls for butter.
    --
    Joe

  5. #45
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    Chef Niloc's Avatar
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    I use it all the time, always made it myself. Sometimes I'll flaver it, like this time of year a vanilla pod, cinnamon stick, star Anees, sauté butternut squash, or butternut squash ravioli.

  6. #46

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    You can also do "brown ghee" and "black ghee" by cooking the milk solids for differing periods of times...gives a significantly different flavor profile to the finished product.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  7. #47
    I've used leftover ghee to cook steaks and burgers in a cast iron pan over coals in the Weber. Worked well!

  8. #48
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    For neutral oils, I like rice bran oil lately. Also good for high temperature situations, good fat composition and the same 450 smoke point as peanut oil. ALso fewer allergy problems...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_bran_oil

  9. #49
    The range of flavor profiles I've got from different brands purchased is crazy. What drives me nuts is when I get one I like and then return for more the flavor is always different. I need to start making this stuff myself.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    The range of flavor profiles I've got from different brands purchased is crazy. What drives me nuts is when I get one I like and then return for more the flavor is always different. I need to start making this stuff myself.

    Well, I assume you're getting Indian ghee and in my experience with India having spent quite a bit of time there on several extended trips from the 70s till recently, consistency is generally a bit of a challenge with most things Indian. I'm not being disparaging in a prejudiced manner I assure you. It's just how it is. Also, levels of freshness has a lot to do with it I suspect. 'Amul' is the brand I like most.

    On a tangent, there's a growing interest here in Melbourne with people churning their own butter. Any of you doing this? Seems like something I can get into and enjoy doing.

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