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Thread: KS v Shig

  1. #21
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    I don't think rriley's comment was sarcastic. He basically answered that he has 7 examples of great quality quantrol from shigefusa, pretty constructive in my opinion. I have seen 7 myself as well, 3 gyuto, 3 yanagiba and a nakiri, all were the best fit and finish j knives I have seen, on par with custom made knife fit and finish/polish. I have seen 2 masamoto KS, both were differerent lengths for same size knife, seems they are not as consistent, still wouldn't mind picking one up one day.

  2. #22
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    then apologize for misinterpreting it as such.

  3. #23
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I think the issue spoken of was broken tips through transit, no?
    Maybe more a service over a quality issue....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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  4. #24
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    I think the issue spoken of was broken tips through transit, no?
    Maybe more a service over a quality issue....
    yep i think that was the thread i was talking about on that other forum

  5. #25
    I have used both,

    Ks is a fun knife with great profile, steel is not ideal considering retention.

    Shig is a true cutter and workhorse. I loved that knife overall. It felt like an extension of my arm. If I were to get another gyuto it would be shig. Edge retention is good and edge taking is great.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by franzb69 View Post
    i read on a different thread that shigefusas also have quality control issues?
    Almost none, as the knife is finished and sharpened by hand, and thus, more control, versus when done finishing on a machine.

    One thing that you might find even on a Shige, is a a tiny dip at the edge (Tihn, that might have been what clunked, depending where it was). This kind of dips occur when a knife is thinned at the edge to a zero or close. Some people might call it overgrind, but it isn't - it is just at the edge and can be corrected with a tip-to-heel pass or two on a diamond plate (it thickens the edge slightly) and then you can either thin the edge or just cut a new bevel. Overgrind is done by a grinder of sorts, and it's a hollow that extends up the edge, and would require a lot more metal to be removed to correct it.

    The two Masamoto that I thinned and refinished, none had grind issues, but both were about .016 at the edge (while Shige is about .005), so thinning both unleashed some potential in cutting. Also, refinishing Masamoto (from vertical to horizontal scratches), and putting a nice handle, changed the look of that knife from an average to a pretty nice.

    Also, the earlier Shiges were much thicker on the spine and above! the edge (you can have any knife to be at zero at the edge, but to measure thickness, you need to take a measurement at 10mm above the edge). It is relatively recently that Shigefusa started grinding thinner, not the least because of this forum.

    Both are different knives and should appeal to people's cutting styles. Performance wise, a thin Shigefusa gyuto will separate food better, but you will have to raise the handle more if you do a lot of tip work and be careful not to bend it, particularly with a sujihiki. Bending is not a problem with Masamoto.

    M


    "All beauty that has no foundation in use, soon grows distasteful and needs continuous replacement with something new." The Shakers' saying.

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  7. #27
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    thank you marko for clarification.

  8. #28
    I think in that level of handmade knife there will always be imperfections or small mistakes, but overall i think they are very consistent knives

  9. #29
    +1

    Not all handmade knives are equal, and when it comes to fit, finish, grind, attention to detail and consistency (it's the only maker who spends work on a tang) Shigefusa is in the top 3 in my opinion. They definitely take a pride in their work. I have always admired that.


    "All beauty that has no foundation in use, soon grows distasteful and needs continuous replacement with something new." The Shakers' saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  10. #30
    Why are we comparing soulful primadonna for 600 with soulless killer for 300??

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