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Thread: KS v Shig

  1. #1

    KS v Shig

    These seem to be two of the favorite profiles/grinds out there, as evidenced by the number of clones and demand etc.

    Post what you like about them, pics if ya got em. Curious to see what people have to say in relation to each.
    Happiness is a sharp knife.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    KS : thin, light, easy to get sharp, sold it


    Shig: prettier, taller, feels more solid, food does not stick as much, keeper


  3. #3
    I am familiar with both knives quite well.

    Shige pros - grind, hand finish, attention to details, polish - you can see and sense a hand made knife. Cons - kasumi is very reactive, thinly ground kasumi knives can be bent with your fingers, a gyuto profile doesn't lend itself well for tip work, micro-chipping is often occurrence.

    Masamoto pros - decent grind, thin, great profile (particularly for tip work), monosteel (will spring back when bent). Cons - reactive, a little bit on a soft side (~60RC), grind at the edge could be a little bit thinner. Thinning the Masamoto above the edge, and hand refinishing it will improve the performance and look.

    Edge retention is better on Shigefusa, probably because of the additional hardness.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  4. #4
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    i love it that 60HRC counts as on the softer side.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    i love it that 60HRC counts as on the softer side.
    When it comes to edge retention in some steels, two or three points (RC) make a big difference. White steel doesn't have alloys that improve wear resistance, so to get a little more juice of out the steel, it needs to be harder.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  6. #6
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    When it comes to edge retention in some steels, two or three points (RC) make a big difference. White steel doesn't have alloys that improve wear resistance, so to get a little more juice of out the steel, it needs to be harder.

    M
    i know. it's still funny, in a very good way.

  7. #7
    I've been thinking about this a little. Is the shig tip design meant for cutting tuna loins into blocks? The curve indicates meat cutting to me. The profile resembles many mioroshi. Glad to see that you have joined in the conversation Marko.
    Happiness is a sharp knife.

  8. #8
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    gyutos are based on French chef knives. French chef knives tend to cut a lot of meat.

  9. #9
    Indeed, cow-swords. I was thinking of what went into the specific design from the Japanese perspective. Tuna as Cows of the Sea.

    I've not seen this done from start to finish, but are the two knives used in Japan to break down Wagyu into individual cuts a Honkatsu for hanging cuts, and then various gyutos for everything else?
    Happiness is a sharp knife.

  10. #10
    From what I observed at Tsukiji last month, gyutos are generally not used to cut loins into blocks. I'll have to look to see if I got any pictures of any actual knives, but I recall seeing mostly yanagi used for cutting tuna into smaller blocks.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

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