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Michael Symon's cutting board on Cook like an iron chef - Page 2
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Thread: Michael Symon's cutting board on Cook like an iron chef

  1. #11
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    Seems to have a metal edge around it -- what's up with that? And how would you give it a thorough cleaning?
    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

  2. #12
    I think it's a concrete countertop with an area to recess the end-grain board in it.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  3. #13
    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    I think its a metal molding around the outside of it.

    Now that I've been thinking about it for a few more seconds, I'm thinking I may cut the hole large enough to put a small hotel pan in it. That way I can just pick up the pan and throw the trash away.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

  4. #14
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Drinky, thanks for the link. I have to admit I lingered for far too long on the first chef.
    Dave has RR, I have GDL
    Whenever I see Giada looking particularly good, I yell up to my wife, "Giada is cooking up some cleavage honey." Now my good wife will actually pause the DVR if she is sportin' a low top and alert me. Good woman she is.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by rockbox View Post
    Marko,

    I'm great for ideas. I'm just not so good at execution.
    I use very basic equipment - a contractor saw, manual clamps, a router, but I have an access to a jointer and a wide belt sander, which helps. I am on a lookout for a better table saw though. It ain't fun cutting 2" thick boards with a light-weight saw.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

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  6. #16
    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    I use very basic equipment - a contractor saw, manual clamps, a router, but I have an access to a jointer and a wide belt sander, which helps. I am on a lookout for a better table saw though. It ain't fun cutting 2" thick boards with a light-weight saw.

    M
    I have all the tools to make it except for the drum sander. I was going to get a drum sander but I used the money to buy the grinder instead. The problem is that I don't have the time or the focus to finish my projects.
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by rockbox View Post
    I have all the tools to make it except for the drum sander... The problem is that I don't have the time or the focus to finish my projects.
    That is the problem. I too have many ideas but not enough time for all. Renting an access to wide-belt sander is much more economical than buying a drum sander. Finding a shop that would rent time on a wide belt sander is harder. For me it was the biggest attraction moving into my present time workshop. The upstairs is a stair building business.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    Cutting the hole in 2.5" thick counter top could be a bit tricky, but doable with a plunge router and a circle cutting jig.
    Hole saw:

    Rough it out with the hole saw, then hand finish with file/paper should get you pretty good results.

    I have a kitchen island cart (which I am now using as a computer desk) that has a IKEA cutting board counter top. $80 for a 49 1/2" x 25 5/8" board. It isn't end grain, but I don't cut on much. Then I used some extra DOM tubing I had for legs and shelf, and put some casters on it.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Hole saw:

    Rough it out with the hole saw, then hand finish with file/paper should get you pretty good results.

    I have a kitchen island cart (which I am now using as a computer desk) that has a IKEA cutting board counter top. $80 for a 49 1/2" x 25 5/8" board. It isn't end grain, but I don't cut on much. Then I used some extra DOM tubing I had for legs and shelf, and put some casters on it.
    I was thinking 6" hole in diameter. Plus the counter top would be about 2.5-3" so a hole saw might not be up for the task. For thinner boards it should work.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    I was thinking 6" hole in diameter. Plus the counter top would be about 2.5-3" so a hole saw might not be up for the task. For thinner boards it should work.

    M
    You can get 6" hole saws. And you can drill from both sides using the pilot drill hole to align them. Or if you couldn't get a 6", you could drill two 3-4" or holes next to each other and cut out the left over material between them to make a 6-8" long oval opening.

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