Quantcast
Cheap way to practice sharpening on single bevel knives? - Page 2
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32

Thread: Cheap way to practice sharpening on single bevel knives?

  1. #11
    Just a word of insight(before Jon B shows up and offers it. :P)

    But those cheapo $20 ones will be the same shape, but the shape is not what is tricky about traditional Japanese cutlery. It's the steel that makes the shape work, and if you learn on cheap, soft steel you will need to develop a whole new skill set because the only thing they will have in common is that they lay flat on a blade road to sharpen.

    I learned on a Tanaka yanagi, and it did me fine. I screwed it up(or so I thought) a few times, but after a year of owning it, I realized that it wasn't even ground properly at the factory. Between me and that Yanagi, the student had become the master.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Potato42's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    296
    I agree best thing to do is just go for it with something half decent at least. When I started I thought $125 was a lot for a knife. Now it feels like chump change. You might mess it up a little but more than likely you'll learn how to do it right eventually and then you'll have not just a decent knife but a great knife.

  3. #13
    I'm going to disagree and say I would go with the cheapo $30 knife to learn to sharpen. The techniques are basically the same. Will you learn how to cut with it properly? No, but then you can learn the cutting technique on the more expensive "full-size" down the line. Cutting incorrectly won't damage the knife! At least not cutting incorrectly for anyone who knows how to use double bevel knife. Sharpening though, is of course a different story. I'd say save the money on the knife and get the cheapo, then get a good natural finisher from maksim or one of the other reputable vendors. Of course sharpening a 300 mm is different than a 150, but if you know how to handle the 150 and troubleshoot all the issues of a single bevel, then moving up to 300 won't be a huge issue. IMO.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by UglyJoe View Post
    I'm going to disagree and say I would go with the cheapo $30 knife to learn to sharpen. The techniques are basically the same. Will you learn how to cut with it properly? No, but then you can learn the cutting technique on the more expensive "full-size" down the line. Cutting incorrectly won't damage the knife! At least not cutting incorrectly for anyone who knows how to use double bevel knife. Sharpening though, is of course a different story. I'd say save the money on the knife and get the cheapo, then get a good natural finisher from maksim or one of the other reputable vendors. Of course sharpening a 300 mm is different than a 150, but if you know how to handle the 150 and troubleshoot all the issues of a single bevel, then moving up to 300 won't be a huge issue. IMO.
    its certainly not the worst thing to do to practice on a cheap knife, but i have seen many times where people pick up bad habits due to crappy steel, improper initial grinding, etc. In general though, my opinion is that the first single bevel knife you get should at least be something you can get some real use out of. Learning how to sharpen and learning how to use the knife go hand in hand. When you understand why the knife is shaped and ground the way it us (through using it), it makes your sharpening a lot better.

  5. #15
    I understand, but my point is that for $30 you can start to get the basics down. I mean, even a "cheap" kasumi 300mm Tanaka is getting close to $200, which (for me at least) is pretty expensive to have a first go at for sharpening single bevels. Would you immediately be able to put a professional finish on said Tanaka after learning on the cheapo knife? No, but you'd be a hell of a lot closer and in less danger of doing real damage to the Tanaka if you'd spent several hours sharpening the cheapo knife.

  6. #16
    How much damage can you do to a single bevel knife while learning to sharpen on it? any good recommended resource to start learning?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by UglyJoe View Post
    I understand, but my point is that for $30 you can start to get the basics down. I mean, even a "cheap" kasumi 300mm Tanaka is getting close to $200, which (for me at least) is pretty expensive to have a first go at for sharpening single bevels. Would you immediately be able to put a professional finish on said Tanaka after learning on the cheapo knife? No, but you'd be a hell of a lot closer and in less danger of doing real damage to the Tanaka if you'd spent several hours sharpening the cheapo knife.
    I think it really depends on the kind of learner you are. However, i happen to believe that sharpening isnt that tough, so if you have an understanding of the basics from reading about it, watching videos, or something like that, you arent too likely to mess things up too bad unless you go crazy with a coarse stone or you totally ignore the fundamentals of what you should be doing. I really do believe that learning how to sharpen the knives and learning how to use them go hand in hand. Around $200 is the lower end of single bevel knives and its pretty normal for beginners... it kind of sucks that the cost of entry is so high, but almost every "cheap" blade (under that range) that i have seen has so many problems with the grind, forging, heat treatment, and/or shape that its just not worth trying to save a buck or two in my opinion.

    I've spent a lot of time teaching people how to sharpen at this point and i dont think i've had anyone yet who couldnt do at least a decent job after just a couple of hours.

    Anyways, i do think what you are saying has some merit and it may very well work for many. But my preferred method of teaching people is just to have them get a decent knife, explain the basics and have them go at it. When they make mistakes (and i think to most its clear when they have made a mistake), come back and ask questions. So far no one has so royally screwed up their knife that it cant be fixed (though i'm sure at some point it will happen ).

  8. #18
    Jon, do you think the Yoshihiro knives are good enough to learn on and use so that I can get both experiences? I don't know if you've heard much about them. Edit: just checked and saw you sell them. There's a different line on eBay from the white 2 ones you sell. Are there any differences in qualities between the different lines?

    Oh and to the person who mentioned a stone, don't worry about me. I've been into stones (for razors) since before I got into knives so I already have a stone for knives coming from Maksim.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by heirkb View Post
    Jon, do you think the Yoshihiro knives are good enough to learn on and use so that I can get both experiences? I don't know if you've heard much about them. Edit: just checked and saw you sell them. There's a different line on eBay from the white 2 ones you sell. Are there any differences in qualities between the different lines?

    Oh and to the person who mentioned a stone, don't worry about me. I've been into stones (for razors) since before I got into knives so I already have a stone for knives coming from Maksim.
    Nice.

    The Yoshi's are supposed to be good knives. The ebay seller sells a Kasumi version and a Hongasumi version. The main difference is steel (Blue #2 for hongasumi), handle (octagonal/hongasumi vs. D-shaped/kasumi), and F&F is better on the hongasumi. The line Jon sells, which I'm sure he won't comment on in this thread, is kind of a hybrid of those two. Octagonal handle, better F&F, but white steel. If you want to know more about them I'd suggest sending him a PM or start a thread on them in his sub-forum.

  10. #20
    So if you guys were thinking of a starter yanagi, would it make a difference if the steel were white or blue steel? The Tanaka is blue steel and the Yoshihiro is white, but I don't really know what the differences would be or which I should start out with. Given what Jon has said, I'm thinking I might pick up a mid-range yanagi and stick to that for a good while just to learn sharpening and use at the same time. Something like a Tanaka, Yoshihiro, or Masamoto KK. If anyone has any recommendations for knives in the price range of these three, please let me know.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •