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Thread: Laser versus non-laser gyuto

  1. #11
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    Sorry to anyone who read this and thought that I was referring to the silhouette of the blade. What I meant was the the way the blade has been ground. Again, the convexity and shape as it aids in the cutting/releasing of food.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Pescador View Post
    Sorry to anyone who read this and thought that I was referring to the silhouette of the blade. What I meant was the the way the blade has been ground. Again, the convexity and shape as it aids in the cutting/releasing of food.
    BTW, I have owned an Artifex and thought it was a great knife for the money.
    "So you want to be a vegetarian? Hitler was a vegetarian and look at how he turned out."

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Pescador View Post
    Sorry to anyone who read this and thought that I was referring to the silhouette of the blade. What I meant was the the way the blade has been ground. Again, the convexity and shape as it aids in the cutting/releasing of food.
    Geometry rather than profile. I concur.

    I picked up an Artifex to play with, but haven't had the time.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck239 View Post
    I don't think laser or non laser matters. When cutting, I think the thinness behind the edge is what shows. My gengetsu and kochi both cut with less resistance then my suisin or tadatsuna cut.... Just my opinion but grind and thinness behind the edge both account for better ease of cutting then the thickness of the knife at the spine..

    -Chuck
    I agree thinness behind the edge a good taper fr. spine to edge road=ease of cutting.Thin Lazors excell in Fine Dineing,like protiens wraped in delicate crust or pako flakes.For those clean perfect cuts like a thin carbon lazor & a damp towel on the board.

  5. #15
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    I have a Artifex that I'm going to thin a little over the weekend. Seems to do OK at food release but I'm more interested in how well it can cut overall after the thinning. When slicing potatoes I use my custom Michael Kaiser that nothing sticks to. It's a rather thick blade but has a great taper that works well while not really being a delicate slicer.


  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomsch View Post
    I have a Artifex that I'm going to thin a little over the weekend. Seems to do OK at food release but I'm more interested in how well it can cut overall after the thinning. When slicing potatoes I use my custom Michael Kaiser that nothing sticks to. It's a rather thick blade but has a great taper that works well while not really being a delicate slicer.

    That's more of a deba.
    "So you want to be a vegetarian? Hitler was a vegetarian and look at how he turned out."

  7. #17
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Maybe it sounds like a cliche but a good knife is a good knife. I'd try some at opposite ends of the thickness scale and see which ones suit your cutting style and what you are cutting better. The 2 best cutting knives I've ever used, one was a laser and one was very thick, but they both cut great

  8. #18
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    The grind is more like a deba except it is a 50/50.

    Quote Originally Posted by El Pescador View Post
    That's more of a deba.

  9. #19
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    It's all in the grind, though the spine thickness matters if you cut tall dense stuff. Some knives will be thicker than some lasers, but will cut better and will have less flex. Lasers are not immune from food sticking.


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