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Most fool-proof way to reprofile edge?
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Thread: Most fool-proof way to reprofile edge?

  1. #1

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    Most fool-proof way to reprofile edge?

    So I'm a little new at sharpening and I managed to make a little "dip" in the edge of my CCK cleaver, so the edge doesn't contact the board in that spot like it should. Good thing the CCK is relatively cheap. I'd like to try to fix this -- what's the fool-proof way for a beginner to go about this? I am thinking I should avoid power tools so that I don't (a) overheat the blade and ruin the temper, and (b) make it worse by removing metal faster than my brain can figure out that I'm doing it wrong. Should I just get a set of metal files? Maybe sandpaper taped to something hard? Do I want to go at an angle as if I'm sharpening, or do I put the edge perpendicular to the abrasive, producing a completely blunt edge with the profile I want, and then go back and sharpen it? I only need to remove about 1mm of material on either side of the dip, or maybe even less, to get back to a smooth profile.

  2. #2
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    grind the edge flat on a diamond stone (use a motion like you are trying to saw into the stone), then thin and resharpen.

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    When I fixed a couple very big chips and dips in a couple cleavers a customer wanted me to fix I used my belt sander perpendicular to the edge to flatten it back out and fix the profile but that may be a little much for someone without a lot of experience plus it leaves a very thick edge which must be thinned back out. But like I said the one was about 3-4 mm deep and 6-7 long! In your case if it's just a "little" dip I'd probably let it work itself out over a few sharpenings unless you really want to make a project of it. The problem with your idea of using it perpendicular to a benchstone is you'll probably end up flattening the whole thing to dead flat and that'll make it very hard to use. With my belt grinder the belts are only 1" wide so I can easily control where the metal is removed. Not sure if this helped... Maybe a picture of the "dip" would help

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    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Low grid diamond plate would remove metal up to 1/8 from the edge. Atoma 120 or DMT XXC


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    It's a little slower than grinding perpendicular to the stone, but it's much easier to thin and resharpen if you reprofile at 45°.

  6. #6

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    You can get some wet/dry paper and adhere it to a flat surface if you don't have a diamond plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by dmccurtis View Post
    It's a little slower than grinding perpendicular to the stone, but it's much easier to thin and resharpen if you reprofile at 45°.

    This is how I would do it too.

  7. #7
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    If it's not that bad and doesn't grossly effect your cutting, I'd just work it out every time you sharpen. If you need to get it done now, though, do like Edipis says and just saw that baby on a diamond stone until you get the profile you want, then thin and sharpen.

  8. #8
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmccurtis View Post
    It's a little slower than grinding perpendicular to the stone, but it's much easier to thin and resharpen if you reprofile at 45°.
    i find it a lot easier to make sure that the defect is gone by grinding perpendicular.

  9. #9
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Nguyen View Post
    You can get some wet/dry paper and adhere it to a flat surface if you don't have a diamond plate.
    That will take you a long time and several rounds of paper, if you have, say, 1/8 chip, and I doubt it will be an effective way. Flat surface helps, but you need an abrasive that cuts better. You remove quite a bit of metal on repairs that involve big chips.

    Everybody should have a coarse diamond plate for flattening and blade repair. I don't know how you guys go without one, given that most here use water stones to sharpen.


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