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Knifes and compound (micro) bevels
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Thread: Knifes and compound (micro) bevels

  1. #1
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    Knifes and compound (micro) bevels

    So, I have been experimenting and learning more about my lovely edge pro by taking a case of a discontinued model of the Dexter basic 10" chefs knives that I found at a restaurant supply store that cost me (I kid you not) about $5 each to an 15/18 degree compound bevel with really good results for such a crappy steel. (I assume it is X50CrMoV15 at best and may be something even softer like 420 or 440A??? ...)

    (Obviously this means that in addition to becoming better with my edge pro, so I can tackle my good knives, I become more popular with friends who have for example crappy Cutco or department store sets by giving them an actually usable knife that maintains an edge reasonably well :- ) )

    Anyway, it occurred to me as I do this once I am good enough with the edge pro, other than the time involved, why shouldn't I compound bevel *all* my fancy Japanese knives (10/15) (or even 10/13) at a minimum instead of the theoretical OOB 15 degrees that most of my gyutos have?

    While obviously a single 10 degree V edge is better than a microbevel, given my knife techniques isn't super perfect, wouldn't I be less likely to chip or otherwise hurt the edge by using a slightly higher microbevel while still having most of the benefits of the geometry of a 10 degree knife by doing this?

    Or am I missing something??

  2. #2

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    I'm far from an expert on uBevels...but I think the steel + HT you are using plays a significant role in how useful/neccessary a uBevel is. For example: I know that Jon says a uBevel is an especially good idea on the SIH line.

    I have starting putting them on all of the crappy SS knives I sharpen for friends in the hope it will help the edge hold up longer with the softer steel.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

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    I think one advantage to a microbevel even when there is good steel is it makes the knife a bit more forgiving of slightly bad form (like even a little bit of torquing) the blade when rock chopping and thus chipping the knife.

    But that is only a conjecture on my part which is why I am waiting for lots of experts to chime in :- )

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    Quote Originally Posted by gic View Post
    I think one advantage to a microbevel even when there is good steel is it makes the knife a bit more forgiving of slightly bad form (like even a little bit of torquing) the blade when rock chopping and thus chipping the knife.

    But that is only a conjecture on my part which is why I am waiting for lots of experts to chime in :- )
    You have a good idea, why not try it out? What works for one person may or may not for another, so the value of expert opinion is of limited value. Put a microbevel on your Japanese blades and see if the edge retention is better, and if there is any performance change.

    Rick

  5. #5
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I like Jon Broida's idea of a single microbevel @30 degree on the right side, as it allows much finer edges.

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