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JCK Original KAGAYAKI CarboNext 210 Gyuto - Page 3
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Thread: JCK Original KAGAYAKI CarboNext 210 Gyuto

  1. #21
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdpx View Post
    Hi Mitbud,


    It's not that hard really - main thing is to make sure it is well lit and be aware of what the reflections on the blade/edge are doing. Also take lots of photos, and edit down to your best ones. Experiment! Look forward to seeing some results, and happy to offer advice if you have any questions.

    R
    Excellent pics. IF you apply the same level creativity and experimentation to achieve the desired outcome in sharpening, I am sure it will be more than a respectable outcome.
    Have fun
    D

  2. #22
    Mitbud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdpx View Post
    Hi Mitbud,

    I don't really know that there is much to say, but I shall try.

    The photos were taken on a small Canon S90. This is a point and shoot pocket camera that has the ability to manual focus and also to set your own ISO and adjust exposure by a couple of stops either way. What I did was simply to put the camera into manual focus mode and focus it down as close as is possible, and then leave it there. I also used an 8X loupe, and basically just held the loupe right in front of the lens. Focusing was done by simply moving the camera/loupe towards and away from the knife until the focus was where I wanted it [or as near as dammit]. The ISO was set to the lowest setting (80 in this case - basically* the lower the number the higher quality the files will be). The quality of the light is also very important in getting good photographs. The light I used was a small desktop print viewing lamp, which puts out a daylight balanced light. The knife was probably about 8 inches away from the light source. [Taking photos under normal household lights lends a reddish tinge to shots.] Most people wont have one of these lights, so perhaps you could try a good light from a window (not direct light - diffuse, or northern light is best) and use white paper to reflect more light on to the knife, and/or to use as background (lack of background distractions also helps)

    If you don't have a camera that you can set to manual focus, you can probably do it with auto focus, but it will involve trial and error and is more annoying I imagine.

    It's not that hard really - main thing is to make sure it is well lit and be aware of what the reflections on the blade/edge are doing. Also take lots of photos, and edit down to your best ones. Experiment! Look forward to seeing some results, and happy to offer advice if you have any questions.

    R
    Thanks!

    The shot that stood out was of the choil, showing the grind marks and the asymmetry of the edge. It shows
    clearly two things I want to know about a knife.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Notaskinnychef's Avatar
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    well done OP, I am also quite pleased with my CN, as it was my first purchase too. I opted for their ES (extra sharpness) option for 10 bucks due to my newbness in sharpening. I could easily shave my arm with it after using it for a month (home kitchen, not a pro). Frankly I was so impressed with being able to do that that I had some substantial bald spot on my arms. Sadly I am a hair brute and thus folicular crop circles were quite noticeable lol

  4. #24
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    Hey all, it has been quite the while since I've been around these parts. Sorry for the absence. Over the last year or so, have there been any better knives-for-the-price than Carbonext in terms of semi-stainless (or stainless), relatively thin knives? I'm back in the market for a knife for a friend who's an enthusiastic home cook, so I'm hoping these are still the bee's knees for the price.

  5. #25
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Just get it. It's basically a TKC clone. Just needs a little attention at first to set up the edge.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  6. #26
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    I was impressed with the steel in the Carbonext. I thinned behind the edge & was able to get it very sharp.Was not hard at all to raise a burr.Holds a decent edge. Put a nice burl handle & sold it to a cook friend. He has been using it at work.

  7. #27
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    The problem I have with my CN is that after sharpening (not quite skillful) to 4000 the cutting goes like that you don't feel the first few millimeters then you hit a brick wall with friction/wedging on carrots.

    But the sharpening process was very easy.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Does the knife steer perhaps?

  9. #29
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    I have no experience with quality knives (or kitchen at all) so can you please give more context about what steering is and how to be detected.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I you hold the knife with a lose grip, and cut into a piece of copy paper, does it cut straight, or does it make a curve?

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