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Thread: Misconception about Kitchen Knives

  1. #11

  2. #12
    I feel kind of in same way Good food comparison
    It is like ready made meals, some of them taste good

    But even bad homemade meal is better then read-made
    Just my

    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    For me they are better cause the soul and passion of the knife maker.

    Find no interest or romantism in stamping anything, just like stamping lids on ready-made meals.
    But I dont mean it makes the knife better performer or better i any measurable manner.

    Apart from that many people honestly think they can chop bones or open cans with knife cause "steel is tough isnt it" ?

  3. #13

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    Funny, this is the second time I have seen the hygenic argument raised for full tangs this week and I think stating full tang knives as less hygenic is a complete hyperbole and misrepresentation. Hygenic issues arise from poor sanitation issues period, regardless of the tools used. From cutting boards to misc kitchen tools etc...a fraction of a gap, whether in full tang or hidden tang (I have seen many hidden tangs with gaps) is not going to present issues with regular cleaning. I have numerous 100 year old full tang knives that still see frequent use.

    I am not siding for one or the other, I love hidden tang westerns, but the hygenic argument is not valid.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by kalaeb View Post
    Funny, this is the second time I have seen the hygenic argument raised for full tangs this week and I think stating full tang knives as less hygenic is a complete hyperbole and misrepresentation. Hygenic issues arise from poor sanitation issues period, regardless of the tools used. From cutting boards to misc kitchen tools etc...a fraction of a gap, whether in full tang or hidden tang (I have seen many hidden tangs with gaps) is not going to present issues with regular cleaning. I have numerous 100 year old full tang knives that still see frequent use.

    I am not siding for one or the other, I love hidden tang westerns, but the hygenic argument is not valid.
    I see your point.

    When a knife handle is completely sealed, with no space for water or bacteria to get in, in my opinion you are going to reduce a chance that some of that stuff might end up on your hands and somehow on the food you prepare. This was an assumption based on reasoning - I didn't base it on anything I have read or heard.

    Any old knife with natural wood handle will show some gap between the tang and the scales. On my F. Dick knife is is about .5mm all around. Granted it is an old knife, but still.

    M


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  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by kalaeb View Post
    Funny, this is the second time I have seen the hygenic argument raised for full tangs this week and I think stating full tang knives as less hygenic is a complete hyperbole and misrepresentation. Hygenic issues arise from poor sanitation issues period, regardless of the tools used. From cutting boards to misc kitchen tools etc...a fraction of a gap, whether in full tang or hidden tang (I have seen many hidden tangs with gaps) is not going to present issues with regular cleaning. I have numerous 100 year old full tang knives that still see frequent use.

    I am not siding for one or the other, I love hidden tang westerns, but the hygenic argument is not valid.
    All I know is that the full tang knife I did a lot of squid with didn't really have any visible gaps between tang and scale and was washed regularly, but it still managed to build up some disgusting rotten squid goop under the scales of the handle...

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Pescador View Post
    Really? How so? Weren't the sheets of steel forged initially?
    Metal for stamping is made to be stamped. It's more than it just happens to be thin. The chemistry isn't compatible with being a good knife.

    -AJ

  7. #17
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    High Carbon Stainless Steel........
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  8. #18
    having spent time looking at various samples under microscope i have to disagree with you on this

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    having spent time looking at various samples under microscope i have to disagree with you on this
    Disagree with...???

    -AJ

  10. #20
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    I actually belief that for people without perfect technique (i.e. someone like me), a thicker German profile knife for rock chopping is a good thing.

    I am a home cook so of course I have far more space than a pro would have but I use two knifes when I cook if rock chopping is needed, a gyuto (I have a bunch of gyuto's I love so I switch them around) for slicing and then a German profile (almost always my Messermeister Elite but sometimes some older Wusthof knifes which were my first knifes purchases).

    But I suppose the fact that I only bought one German profile knife in 10 years and maybe 20 guyto's says something...)

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