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Thread: Misconception about Kitchen Knives

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    High Carbon Stainless Steel........


    Steel can be both high carbon and "stainless". ZDP-189 for example contains more than twice as much carbon than white #1 but is stain resistant by virtue of the high (20%) chromium content in the alloy.

  2. #22
    on the stamped knife vs forged knife... i've spend time not only using, but also inspecting both with knife experts and metalurgists in japan. There are some pretty good stamped and/or stock removal knives being produced now days with heat treatments that easily put them on par with some of the best forged knives i've seen.

  3. #23
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    would someone mind listing some examples of popular stamped knives? im just curious which knives are being discussed here.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post

    When a knife handle is completely sealed, with no space for water or bacteria to get in,

    That unfortunately is wishful thinking. From my side too cause Im quite concerned about bacteria in the kitchen. Saying totally sealed is like to say bacteria free kitchen.

    You would have to have a metal handle on your knife I think. I dont want that.

  5. #25

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    Stamped and stock removal are not the same thing. I'm wondering if perhaps what you guys call stamping is actually something else. I used to melt down 50-100 tons od stampings per day for about 5 years, including knife blanks. I'm pretty familiar with the chemistry. Not saying you're wrong but your observations don't match my observations.

    -AJ

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Metal for stamping is made to be stamped. It's more than it just happens to be thin. The chemistry isn't compatible with being a good knife.

    -AJ
    I'm going to say what many people here I'm sure are thinking, and that is, you have no idea what you are talking about.

  7. #27
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    Surely makers of high end stock removal knives (e.g. the Sakai layzors) are working with stock which has already been machine forged?.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Stamped and stock removal are not the same thing. I'm wondering if perhaps what you guys call stamping is actually something else. I used to melt down 50-100 tons od stampings per day for about 5 years, including knife blanks. I'm pretty familiar with the chemistry. Not saying you're wrong but your observations don't match my observations.

    -AJ
    Please divulge. What is it about their "chemistry" that is bad?

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian View Post
    Please divulge. What is it about their "chemistry" that is bad?
    Stampings usually have very low alloy content, particularly very low Mn content for deep drawing properties. You want a low shear strength to facilitate easy cutting of the sheet.

    -AJ

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    That unfortunately is wishful thinking. From my side too cause Im quite concerned about bacteria in the kitchen. Saying totally sealed is like to say bacteria free kitchen.

    You would have to have a metal handle on your knife I think. I dont want that.

    We are not talking here in absolute terms, are we? When you have a handle with components (one piece construction vs scales) that will not separate and create gaps and the handle from inside is filled with epoxy that can move with the movement of the wood without cracking, in my world that would be a pretty sealed handle. The joint between the handle and bolster are sealed with epoxy.

    On microscopic level there always will be voids and gaps for bacteria to hide, so if that what you mean by impossibility of bacteria-free environment, I would have to agree with you.

    By the way, you would have to sterilize your knife with a metal handle for it to be completely bacteria-free.

    M


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