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Thread: Some advice from the experienced "flippers" among you?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Chefdog View Post
    Thanks for all the replies guys. I think what I was attempting, evidently unsuccessfully, to get at was not Yoshikane vs Heiji/Gengetsu/etc, but the cost/benefit of experimenting with an affordable knife and later upgrading, or just buying the high end knife right off the bat.
    Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that the higher end knife will necessarily be a better knife for you. If you can specify what in a knife you're looking for - handle aside - members here could probably direct you toward a knife that may be a better fit than the Yoshikane.

    If you happen to have a favorite, "I will never sell/give away knife" currently and are looking for a similar wa-handled knife, please tell us. Because like western handled knives, wa-handled knives can vary so much as far as profile, geometry, thinness behind the edge, thickness at the spine, stiffness, edge retention, taper, etc. Again, if you have an idea of characteristics that you're looking for, members here could tell you whether the Yoshikane is a good fit for what you like, or if another knife is a better fit.

    Personally speaking, I've tried several knives in the $200 to $400 range and the more expensive knives have not necessarily been better fits for me than less expensive knives.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  2. #22
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
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    Again, thanks for all the advice guys. It looks like you've steered me towards getting acquainted with the Yoshi. I'm gonna bring it in to work with me tomorrow and give it a shot. I'm hoping that a few days with it and Ill forget all about the handle.
    Thanks for the guidance.

  3. #23
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    wa is so much better than yo, i don't think you'll have much of an issue, after you get acquainted.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chefdog View Post
    It's more about getting used to wa vs yo than one particular knife vs another. I'm so used to pinching right up against that concave section of bolster on a yo-handled knife and having the heel directly below that, that when I grab a wa-handled knife it feels really awkward. The lack of taper at the ferrule and the length of the machi put everything just far enough out of my comfort zone that I feel like a baby holding a knife for the first time.
    Since,it is you literally just you trying to get used to a wa handle. You might as well use it. There will always be time for other knives, and reselling in the marketplace you can usually get most of your money back. It is worth the experience.

  5. #25
    Senior Member turbochef422's Avatar
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    Use it because you can always re sell it. I thought I would like the blade height of a takeda because that's what I was used to and found out I love cutting with a masamoto which is the complete opposite of what I expected. Definitely buy and sell (or keep) a few before you make up your mind. You never know what's gonna feel "right"

  6. #26
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by turbochef422 View Post
    Use it because you can always re sell it. I thought I would like the blade height of a takeda because that's what I was used to and found out I love cutting with a masamoto which is the complete opposite of what I expected. Definitely buy and sell (or keep) a few before you make up your mind. You never know what's gonna feel "right"
    +1

    I craved a Takeda for years, and once I actually used one I realized it wasn't to my tastes at all. Just didn't feel right. I never would have thought I'd enjoy my Kato as much as I do, but as stated above it just takes handling lots of knives to figure out what truly feels right in your hand. Another reason I love the passarounds...
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  7. #27
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
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    FWIW:
    Here's the gyutos that have come and gone in the last year and a half (all 240's):
    TKC- too curvy, high tip, didn't like the profile
    Addict 2- too light, too tall, a pain on the stones- 1st wa, lasted a month of sporadic use
    Konosuke HD- gave an appreciation of what a thin knife can do, but ultimately felt a little too delicate for my taste, 2nd attempt at a wa handle,
    Yoshihiro- This was another attempt at a wa handle, but right out of the box it just wasn't for me, so I sold it to a friend, who really likes it. I never really gave this one a shot.

    What I kept (for now):
    Hattori FH- this is actually in the BST now. I like this knife, it's thin enough, but relatively stiff and doesn't need babying, takes a nice edge (although I might be migrating away from stainless), has a profile that I like, but the very flat grind can be annoying with its poor food release. It's a very good knife, but I don't like to hang onto stuff that won't be used. Although if it doesn't sell, I'll probably just put it in the block at home.
    Suien VC- Got this from Jon a few weeks ago and am very happy with it. I like how easy the carbon is to grind despite being fairly hard. It's allowed me to start experimenting with my sharpening a little more since its so easy to move the steel around. I've been slowly thinning and convexing the front, and I really like to way it releases potatoes, onion, etc. It's stiff, pretty flat on the edge, unreactive, and again, thin enough to cut well, but feels substantial in the hand.
    Yoshikane- TBD

    So, that's where I stand. I think writing it all down actually helped me identify what I will look for when I start using the Yoshi, so thanks to whoever suggested it.

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