Quantcast
Simi noob here, looking for a decent knife.
Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 66

Thread: Simi noob here, looking for a decent knife.

  1. #1

    Simi noob here, looking for a decent knife.

    Hey guys, Ive been cooking for around 6-7 years, nothing to fancy, but the job I have had for the last 1.5 years has me using a knife more then ever.

    At the restaurant I work at, we do everything from scratch, so you understand that means a lot of dicing, chopping, and all around cutting. But the owners never invested much money into knifes, it seems foolish to be seeing how much we use them. I had a decent knife, by my standards probably not yours lol, it was a Guy Fiettie (the dude from diners driveins and dives) knuckle duster knife, it was decent and did the job until one of my co-workers broke it somehow, after that I mostly used my boss's knife which was a Shun 10" chef knife, but last night some idiot threw it in the trash and they took the trash this morning. All the other knifes we have are from walmart, so yeah, they suck.

    So Im guessing Im asking for info on a decent knife, or set, would be. After browsing for a while on this forum I see that most of you are more into the very nice, very expensive type of knifes, but I do not make that much money, I need something around $100 or so. The only companies that I even know about are Shun and Global.

    I would like a large chefs knife, I like them nice and wide and we use the side of the knifes for plating a lot. Any style of blade is fine. Something that can be dropped and wont take any real damage, preferably handle heavy so the end of the handle will hit the ground first and not the point.

    Could probably also use a small pairing knife, and a 8-10inch for general use.

    Sorry if this sounds silly or anything, just asking for some tips. Thanks guys.

    *edit* ohh and I almost forgot, something that feels nice in the hand, I am right handed, and I pinch the base of the blade with my thumb and index, and the rest of the fingers stay on the handle.

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    428

  4. #4
    http://japanesechefsknife.com/FKMSer...EIGHT:%20236px

    Most here would recommend a gyuto from fujiwara over those knives, I own a 240mm gyuto from this line and it's a great knife for a great price
    Last edited by Von blewitt; 02-17-2013 at 05:06 AM. Reason: Jinks
    Huw
    In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. Jiro Ono

  5. #5
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    870
    Knives getting broken and thrown in the trash?
    Sounds like a job for the Forschner Fibrox!
    http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Che.../dp/B0000CF8YO

    I wouldn't want to bring even a $100 knife to that work environment, it's not worth the stress. This bad boy will do the job well and is cheap enough to be easily replaced. In fact, it's cheap enough that work might spring for a few to go around.
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,405
    I would fill up the questionnaire first =D

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...should-you-buy

    answer it on here.

    some of the standard questions on there weren't answered.

  7. #7
    +1 fujiwara fkm

  8. #8
    Senior Member JKerr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    367
    Aye, check out the Fujiwara. Tojiro DP is another decent option for a bit more.

    How do you sharpen by the way? Without a doubt the steel on these will be better than the Knuckle Duster but less forgiven and seeing as it sounds like thework environment isn't too kind on knives if you're not using stones to sharpen (and fix) said knives perhaps it'd be better to grab something you can easy maintain on a steel and isn't fragile, ie the Victorinox fibrox line as Wenus2 suggested.

    Alternatively, and I'm aware I'm gonna sound like a broken record, but I'd say it's worth having a look at a cheap chinese cleaver like a CCK or dexter russel. Once you're use to cleavers they're incredibly efficient and great for scooping ingredients, scrapping your board, plating, smashing garlic/ginger etc.

    Cheers,
    Josh

  9. #9
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Norn Iron
    Posts
    1,393
    I'd go for something like the suggestions so far. I thought my knives got beat up by my co-workers, but throwing them in the bin? That's a whole different level. I'd also recommend getting a 270 if you do a lot of prep

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,405
    i'd say keep the knife by your side at all times. wear a butcher's belt or something so noone can just get it or use it

    i know i'm getting one.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •