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Thread: Sharpening advice....

  1. #31
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    By hand it's really only about 45 minutes of work. Not a big deal.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  2. #32
    My logic tells me i would put the blade on a page and continue the original lines to find out the place of the original tip. I would then mark the place of the new tip on the blade keeping it at the same height as the original one.
    I would then blend the lines from the new tip to the blade. (both on the height and the width of the blade).

    Whichever way you choose to do it - good luck.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
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    Someone might have said it allready, but use the side of your coarsest stone so it doesn't ruin the sharpening surface. This obviously won't work if you're using a diamond plate. I use an old "peacock" stone flattener for tip repairs to get the shape 95% and then smooth it out on the side of regular stones.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Use your sidewalk or piece of cement curb. As others have mentioned, it would be murder on your stones or plate and painfully slow.

    Not only is the sidewalk coarser, but the extra real estate allows for longer strokes and much faster progress.
    -draw the new shape out on the blade w/ sharpie and color in the metal you plan to remove
    -dont press too hard when grinding
    -move parallel to the blade, this makes getting a smooth curve easier and is less prone to chipping
    -you can generate a surprising amount of heat: check the temp and use water if needed.
    -after the coarse grinding is done, clamp the blade spine-up. If using a metal camp or vise, use wood or a few layers of cardboard on either side of the blade to protect it
    -use sandpaper perpendicular to the spine in a "shoe shine" motion to even out the grinding and round the spine. Tape on the back of the sandpaper helps to extend its life before ripping. They a little more $, but you can also use belt-sander belts and cut them
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  5. #35
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    I wld look for the cheapest belt sander as it may cost more if your stones adn plates becomes really, really uneven.

    besides.. its a new toy to play with. I believe that there are some available under USD 50.

    After the session on belt sander, sandpaper say 600 grit wld be ideal for the clean up . Do be aware that teh real estate of the tip is so thin and tiny that it literally disappears and leaves a fresh blackened tip. Thus the last bit I wld prefer sandpaper..

    whilst t it have fun..

    d

  6. #36

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Lots of good ideas, thanks guys!

    I was thinking about using a cinder block to do a lot of the steel removal, and I have a few floating around...any reason that shouldn't work as well as concrete?
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    A cinder block should work well and will be more comfortable both interms of ergonomics and explanations to neighbors.

    I vaguely remember some video of Carter from back when he was more interested in unorthodox grooming practices than flying helicopters where he sharpens an ax on a cinder block and then shaves with it.
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  8. #38

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Thanks! I'm planning to work this over the weekend...I'll take copious photos so you guys can make fun of me.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  9. #39

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Oh, another couple of questions...do you try to keep the cinderblock wet? does that make any difference for this task + material? Also, assuming that grinding the spine down works, would it make sense to also use the cinderblock to remove most/all of the chipping?
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  10. #40

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    It's a little grainy, lighting was tricky today, how does this line look to you guys?
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

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