Quantcast
Shrinking Scales?
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Shrinking Scales?

  1. #1
    Senior Member skiajl6297's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    275

    Shrinking Scales?

    I bought a well used Blazen 240 on this site, and it was in excellent condition on arrival. I have been enjoying learning to sharpen, and really just going to town on all kinds of home chopping work. I love the knife.

    The other night, I noticed that the tang is protruding over the scales, just ever so slightly - so that the full tang metal is now feeling slightly raised over the scales. Aside from rehandling (which I am sure is a great option based on the work I see on this site) is there any way for me to fix this at home? It isn't a huge deal, but I am noticing that it makes a difference in my day-to-day use when things don't feel polished and completely flush.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,405
    hmm if the scales are made of wood, perhaps dipping it in mineral/linseed oil for a day or two would help.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    2,969
    What kind of wood is it and where do you live? Is that even wood or is it a micarta/laminate?
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  4. #4
    Senior Member skiajl6297's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    275
    Unsure what type of wood, but looks like wood. Live in Maryland. Can't seem to figure how to load pics but have some good samples.

  5. #5


    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Homeless, PA
    Posts
    9,462
    Japan is very humid (where the scales are installed) and wood tends to shrink in many parts of the USA and different times of the year makes the problem even worse. It sucks, not something any of us like, but it's very normal.

  6. #6
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    Japan is very humid (where the scales are installed) and wood tends to shrink in many parts of the USA and different times of the year makes the problem even worse. It sucks, not something any of us like, but it's very normal.
    Does the wood being stabilized help to prevent this?
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  7. #7
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Outside the Beltway
    Posts
    526
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    Japan is very humid (where the scales are installed) and wood tends to shrink in many parts of the USA and different times of the year makes the problem even worse. It sucks, not something any of us like, but it's very normal.
    Will the standard pakkawood type scales respond to soaking in mineral oil? I guess there's no potential harm in trying right?
    I have a Suien gyuto that I got a couple months ago and it's got just the slightest bit of shrinkage too. I'd rather not go at it with the sander if I don't have too.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Springfield, VA
    Posts
    13
    I'm just a beginner with japanese style knives, but I am a woodworker. Wood will expand/contract with changes in humidity, so if the scales were put on in the humidity of Japan and then brought to Maryland where it's fairly dry because of winter, you'd expect some shrinking. It may expand back out in the summer with Maryland's humidity, but of course air conditioning cuts back on the humidity within the house.

    Any finishes on the wood will slow the rate of expansion/contraction, as it is harder for moisture to be absorbed by the wood. How much it is slowed or if it is stopped completely depends on the finish. Most finishes to not completely seal the wood from the air/humidity.

    I don't really work with "stabilized" woods, but from my understanding (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong), the wood is filled with polymers or resins (often through a vacuum process) to almost plasticize the wood. That adds strength to a weak piece of wood and minimizes or eliminates any expansion/contraction. Of course, that assumes that the stabilization process was done correctly. It should help with making the scale "waterproof" for kitchen use as well.

    Hope that helps!
    Tyler

  9. #9
    Senior Member skiajl6297's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    275
    Great point on humidity inside. Heat constantly running and bone dry indoors. Would certainly explain it. Thank you all!

  10. #10


    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Homeless, PA
    Posts
    9,462
    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Does the wood being stabilized help to prevent this?

    It can still happen but it's rare. What we see with stabilized woods (sometimes) is that you can feel a bulge from the steel bits if the wood shrinks vs that sharp edge steels bits like you do with factory scales so it's a much less pronounced problem.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts