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In the market for some high end knives! Need your thoughts! - Page 2
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Thread: In the market for some high end knives! Need your thoughts!

  1. #11
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    El Pescador's Avatar
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    One of those reviews is my Asai. I got lucky with mine as its not too thick like some of them are. If you could find one like mine I would highly recommend buying it. While not as popular as some knive brands, they are both unique in texture and quite rewarding to use.
    "So you want to be a vegetarian? Hitler was a vegetarian and look at how he turned out."

  2. #12
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    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on graduating.

    Since you're cooking Asian with a wok, then you'll want to seriously consider a cleaver like the CCK 1303. And since you're new to sharpening, this knife is inexpensive and it's tall. If you make a mistake, it's not expensive so it's not a big deal. And since it's tall, you have lots of material (metal) to work with. By the 3rd or 4th time sharpening, you should be pretty comfortable.

    For paring, I'd go with an Ealy paring knife. At the cost of a Shun paring knife (the Shun classic is actually quite nice), you get a knife from a fantastic custom knife maker.

    For the gyuto, I'll let others make a recommendation. I do have some Shun classic and premier knives. While I don't dislike them, I don't like them enough to recommend them. I have an Asai aogami super damascus that sees no action. I prefer thinner knives and non-kurochi finishes.

  3. #13

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    I would go for chefs knife, paring knife and an usuba. You sound like a man who is eager to learn, for asian style cooking home, I think it is fun to use usuba.

    And a stone to match. Dont nee to start with many stones, you need one grit, maybe two. Learn from there.

  4. #14
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
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    $700 is not much for 3~4 knives if you want high-end with Aesthetic J-knife! IMO, spend $180 for stones, $120 for cheap paring knife & Chinese cleaver(if you do lots Chinese cooking, you need one for sure) & $400 for a nice gyuto! use your old knives to learn how to sharpen....
    Charles ***[All statements I made here only my personal opinion and nothing more!]*** & Please bare with me for my crappy English!!

  5. #15

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    cclin - I agree with that. "High-end" may have a different meaning for me just starting out. I like the way you broke that out, makes a lot of sense to me. I guess the main task I have ahead of me is finding the right gyuto!

    I may be posting links to knives that I find on this thread to gather more opinions as I am searching. Thanks!

  6. #16

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    bieniek - Thanks for the recommendation. Yes, I will mainly be cooking asian in the home. Lots of vegetables so usuba makes sense. Question for you though, why usuba and not nakiri? Is the only difference that the usuba is sharpened on one side and the nakiri on both? What affect will this have when prepping?

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by don View Post
    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on graduating.

    Since you're cooking Asian with a wok, then you'll want to seriously consider a cleaver like the CCK 1303. And since you're new to sharpening, this knife is inexpensive and it's tall. If you make a mistake, it's not expensive so it's not a big deal. And since it's tall, you have lots of material (metal) to work with. By the 3rd or 4th time sharpening, you should be pretty comfortable.

    For paring, I'd go with an Ealy paring knife. At the cost of a Shun paring knife (the Shun classic is actually quite nice), you get a knife from a fantastic custom knife maker.

    For the gyuto, I'll let others make a recommendation. I do have some Shun classic and premier knives. While I don't dislike them, I don't like them enough to recommend them. I have an Asai aogami super damascus that sees no action. I prefer thinner knives and non-kurochi finishes.
    Thanks Don! Great advice there. I have seen CCK cleavers around on this forum and other sites. I will definitely look into that.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by etbenton View Post
    bieniek - Thanks for the recommendation. Yes, I will mainly be cooking asian in the home. Lots of vegetables so usuba makes sense. Question for you though, why usuba and not nakiri? Is the only difference that the usuba is sharpened on one side and the nakiri on both? What affect will this have when prepping?
    An usuba is a traditional Japanese knife, and excels in such tasks as katsuramuki, but the nakiri is much more suitable for prepping vegetables for a stir fry. Usubas are also one of the hardest knives to master. The single-bevel construction of the usuba also results in excessive "steering" when attempting to use it in the Western manner of cutting vegetables. If you want to experiment, then by all means get an usuba, but you will me much better served by a nakiri or a Chinese cleaver.

    You may want to browse the knives available from Japanese Chefs Knife to see if there are any knives that catch your eye and you want to ask about in the forum. Although somewhat "plain", the Hattori Forum knives with cocobolo handles are very good "high-end" knives: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/JCKHattoriForums.html



    Katsuramuki:


  9. #19
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    I agree. Unless you are doing katsuramuki there's no reason to jump in on an usuba as a first time purchase. They have a steep learning curve and if you don't fully understand single bevel sharpening you can mess one up pretty bad. Considering you have to spend a good bit to get a decent one its a potentially high risk situation.

    Gyuto, nakiri and a petty may be the order of the day here. Throw in a cck 1303 just for fun because they are cheap too and you are off!
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  10. #20
    Senior Member WiscoNole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Gyuto, nakiri and a petty may be the order of the day here. Throw in a cck 1303 just for fun because they are cheap too and you are off!
    I like this combo. Don't waste money on a nice paring knife. A paring knife rarely needs to be razor sharp, so you should devote more money to your gyuto/petty/nakiri.

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