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In the market for some high end knives! Need your thoughts! - Page 3
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Thread: In the market for some high end knives! Need your thoughts!

  1. #21
    Senior Member rdpx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WiscoNole View Post
    I like this combo. Don't waste money on a nice paring knife. A paring knife rarely needs to be razor sharp, so you should devote more money to your gyuto/petty/nakiri.
    I was humming and hawing over whether to spend on a good japanese paring/petty, mainly due to oft seen advice on here "you need a gyuto and a petty". I ended up figuring that as I have always tended to use a chef knife for pretty much everything, I didn't need one, but in deference to the experience behind the advice am going to get one of these Victorinox ones, on sale for equivalent of $8.50 down the road.... I actually really like the way it looks as well, with the "bubinga wood" handle [fibrox version is only about $5!]



    Regarding advice to the etbenton, would a cleaver and a nakiri not perform the same function?

    Robert

  2. #22
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Yeah, I just threw the cck in there cause it's pretty cheap to try it out and see if he likes it. Not essential but for Asian cooking it's obviously pretty useful. I myself have decided that I am not a cleaver guy.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  3. #23
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdpx View Post
    ......would a cleaver and a nakiri not perform the same function?
    they are very different knife! Nakiri is thin & lite weight with narrow & flat profile. it mainly design push cut or forward cut for vegetable! Chinese cleaver has more wide/heavy/thick/tough blade with little cure edge. it can use for push cut, rock, chop & forward cut. Chinese vegetable cleaver is all-purpose knife for vegetable or protein without bone, Chop cleaver for protein with bone.
    you won't see any Chinese chef use a nakiri in the kitchen..........at less I never seen one!!
    Charles ***[All statements I made here only my personal opinion and nothing more!]*** & Please bare with me for my crappy English!!

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    An usuba is a traditional Japanese knife, and excels in such tasks as katsuramuki, but the nakiri is much more suitable for prepping vegetables for a stir fry. Usubas are also one of the hardest knives to master. The single-bevel construction of the usuba also results in excessive "steering" when attempting to use it in the Western manner of cutting vegetables. If you want to experiment, then by all means get an usuba, but you will me much better served by a nakiri or a Chinese cleaver.
    +1 Couldn't agree more

  5. #25
    Senior Member rdpx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    The single-bevel construction of the usuba also results in excessive "steering" when attempting to use it in the Western manner of cutting vegetables.
    (An aside from main thread, not hijacking, but not worth new thread.....)

    I cut up a swede yesterday (rutabaga in US?) with my 70/30 210mm Carbonext, to see how it would fare. Got a fair bit of steering after it was about half way through. Is this poor technique, wrong knife, or just normal?

  6. #26
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdpx View Post
    (An aside from main thread, not hijacking, but not worth new thread.....)

    I cut up a swede yesterday (rutabaga in US?) with my 70/30 210mm Carbonext, to see how it would fare. Got a fair bit of steering after it was about half way through. Is this poor technique, wrong knife, or just normal?
    It's a hard vegetable and just harder to correct steering once it sets in regardless of how it started. I wouldn't call it "poor" technique, it can happen when applying more force. More force = less accuracy.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  7. #27
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Loosen your grip. Add a few strokes on the left side, and ease the shoulder.

  8. #28

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    I have an Asai damascus knife on order. I was able to see the whole line in person in Seattle at Epicurean Edge a couple weeks back. I was very impressed with the fit and finish of the knives. The attention to detail seems immaculate. Also they had nice balance and are VERY pretty to look at. Apparently, Mr. Asai has terminal cancer and will likely not be producing these knives much longer. I opted to get one of these beautiful knives while I still can. If you like damascus, the acid etched damascus powdered metallurgical steel (Asai PM line) is absolutely stunning. Like contour lines on a topo map. Here is a video: https://vimeo.com/59814616



    Hope this helps in some way!
    Keegan

    Quote Originally Posted by etbenton View Post
    Haha that's okay. One more thought, and this is pretty specific, but I have seen Asai knives being discussed on a few different threads. Anybody have thoughts on those?

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by etbenton View Post
    bieniek - Thanks for the recommendation. Yes, I will mainly be cooking asian in the home. Lots of vegetables so usuba makes sense. Question for you though, why usuba and not nakiri? Is the only difference that the usuba is sharpened on one side and the nakiri on both? What affect will this have when prepping?
    You see. This forum is all about standarization.
    From my own experience with nakiri I can tell you, I have one good one and never use it, its like a chefs knife without a tip and its use is pointless. Same with cleaver. Same with petty to some extend, yet that one is used a bit more.
    For some others the santoku is pointless.
    You could say that 100% of home cooking can be done without any stress with chefs knife and a paring/petty, yet you will hear many times nakiri/santoku/cleaver/whatever shite is a must-have. Must for what exactly?

    So my point is, take a knife that is a challenge. You dont do it for living and if chopping takes few more minutes, so what? What super-tough asian veg do you cut everyday to have soooooo much steering problems?

    You also said no big deal about learning new skills, there you go then, you'd have to learn to sharpen, use and look after single bevel knives.

    As to the price, well
    http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/...ata-usuba.html

    One of the favourite vendors here sells this decent one for 180 dollars. Stones? You anyway have to get them.


  10. #30
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    The recommendation of a cheap parer is interesting (and good). Kinda depends on how you want to spend the $700 gift money. If you're thinking of going with an inexpensive parer such as the Forschner, then I wouldn't even include this as part of the gift money.

    In that case, your gift could look something like the following:
    1. $600 for a gyuto
    2. $60 for a 1000/6000 combo sharpening stone
    3. $40 for the CCK 1303 cleaver

    I know that you mentioned that >$400 is too much to spend on one knife, but if it's a gift and your primary knife for many years to come, then it can be worth it. However, if a >$400 knife means that it won't be used, then it's not the right knife right now.

    The chinese cleaver is recommended since you cook Chinese food - wok and dim sum. Whether it's the intro to Eat, Drink, Man, Woman, or Martin Yan, or Iron Chef Chen Kenichi, you're going to see some amazing food and knife work. And you'll want to try it out.

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