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Thread: Bacteria on Raw fish for sushi

  1. #21
    Glad for this thread. I'm concerned about the comments of Madmel though - as I work with supermarkets in Singapore and I have seen the areas where fish are butchered into fillets. Honestly, in many of the chains, there are inadequate hygiene practices for the cutting and sale of fish parts. The back of the store is where it typically happens, and there is tons of cross contamination.

    In fact, much less than thinking about eating it raw, I informed my family to avoid buying any raw fish from them altogether. (SNS, Giant, smaller FairPrice stores - Carrefour, I haven't been there in a while so don't know how things are now)

    Typically the safest are the stores with large fish areas within the supermarket with the cuts being made visible to the passserby traffic. These areas are exclusively used for fish, and they tend to be safer. I still wouldn't eat something without a sashimi certification though (3-4x the price) as i just can't be sure. I do still see things like storage of shellfish in recently vacated fish styrofoam boxes and vice versa, recycling old ice to cover fish at the end of the shopping day etc...

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    Glad for this thread. I'm concerned about the comments of Madmel though - as I work with supermarkets in Singapore and I have seen the areas where fish are butchered into fillets. Honestly, in many of the chains, there are inadequate hygiene practices for the cutting and sale of fish parts. The back of the store is where it typically happens, and there is tons of cross contamination.

    In fact, much less than thinking about eating it raw, I informed my family to avoid buying any raw fish from them altogether. (SNS, Giant, smaller FairPrice stores - Carrefour, I haven't been there in a while so don't know how things are now)

    Typically the safest are the stores with large fish areas within the supermarket with the cuts being made visible to the passserby traffic. These areas are exclusively used for fish, and they tend to be safer. I still wouldn't eat something without a sashimi certification though (3-4x the price) as i just can't be sure. I do still see things like storage of shellfish in recently vacated fish styrofoam boxes and vice versa, recycling old ice to cover fish at the end of the shopping day etc...
    Yeah I agree these things do happen, usually with the lower end supermarkets like SNS etc. Carrefour, FairPrice Finest and Cold Storage often have pretty visible work areas and I've seen the HACCP certification on the walls of these places. Please tell me that it is a valid one. As I mentioned, I only do supermarket fish for those species that can't be found at the local fishery and wet market so it's narrowed down mostly to salmon. And I usually buy my fish whole haha. Does the shashimi certification make a difference in the supermarkets? I just thought it was a gimmick to mark up the prices of the fish. And I NEVER buy shellfish/prawns from supermarkets. I prefer my shellfish live and prawns fresh and not soaked in some liquid.

    Good thread this. Makes people think of what they are putting into their bodies and where they get their food from.

  3. #23
    Here's an article on "cod worms." I've seen similar worms in rockfish, Ling Cod, Halibut, Pollack, and other white fleshed fish.

    http://www.foodrepublic.com/2011/05/...od+Republic%29
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  4. #24
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    I just got inspected by the health department this afternoon. I asked him about salmon and sushi. He said the FDA requires ALL salmon to be frozen 7 days prior to be served. He added most fish houses do the freezing for the customer and then sell them a thawed product. Also only yellow fin, big eye and blue fin tuna can be served raw.

    The salmon rule also applies to ceviche.

  5. #25
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    I just got inspected by the health department this afternoon. I asked him about salmon and sushi. He said the FDA requires ALL salmon to be frozen 7 days prior to be served. He added most fish houses do the freezing for the customer and then sell them a thawed product. Also only yellow fin, big eye and blue fin tuna can be served raw.

    The salmon rule also applies to ceviche.
    Seems a bit odd since the supermarkets around here all carry FRESH salmon pretty much year round. Or do you mean that salmon used for sushi must be frozen? But even that seems a little odd -- doesn't freezing and defrosting cause the cells of the flesh to burst, increasing the potential for bacterial infection (to say nothing of what it does to texture)?
    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

  6. #26
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    Salmon for sushi must be frozen.

    Don't ask me about the rules. I just follow them.

  7. #27
    From what I understand, if a freezer is super-cold, the meat will freeze fast enough that the ice crystals that form remain small and thus do not burst the cells. A regular freezer isn't cold enough to flash-freeze and gives the water enough time to form large water crystals which will burst the cells, destroying the texture of the meat.
    Len

  8. #28
    Thanks for the article Mhlee... very interesting. Yes, I believe that is one of the purposes of the flash freezing.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Here's an article on "cod worms." I've seen similar worms in rockfish, Ling Cod, Halibut, Pollack, and other white fleshed fish.

    http://www.foodrepublic.com/2011/05/...od+Republic%29
    Nothing compared to what you find in Swordfish. Yeck.

  10. #30
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    While I tend to eat what I've killed most of the time, I occasionally buy fish from the local market. I eat what is in season and what is locally harvested. Tuna season was a bust last year so I ended up buying tuna all summer long. I eat alot of poke and sashimi. I do three things when I buy fish at a market I look at it. I smell it. I touch it. Is the color off? Is it shiny? Fish shouldn't smell fishy. Is the flesh firm? Ask how old it is. Buy on special, as the fish was brought in special fresh for the sale.

    Best piece of fish you never ate was the one you walked away from!

    Pesky

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