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Thread: Bacteria on Raw fish for sushi

  1. #41
    See the bottom of that link.

    Just because it's frozen doesn't make Yellowfin Tuna sustainable. It's not. Sustainability is based on how much is taken from the ocean vs. how much the fishery can sustain. Even though Yellowfin may be, arguably, the least damaged tuna fishery among red tuna, that doesn't make it sustainable.

    The only tuna fishery out here that I know of that's somewhat maintained its production is the Albacore fishery. And luckily for me, I'd MUCH rather have fresh Albacore than Yellowfin any day.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  2. #42
    IMO there are many supermarket fish that are fine for sushi/sashimi. As always use your eyes and nose. Get whole fish and check for freshness. Striped bass...red snapper...greek sea bream...

    In Canada we don't have this rule where salmon must be frozen for a certain amount of time. When I don't get salmon from our regular supplier there are plenty of other fish mongers I pick up salmon from, and all of them sell to the public so the public should have many places to buy from.

  3. #43
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    There are a lot of asian and japanese markets here that specifically sell sashimi grade fish cuts. Don't know if that actually means anything though.

  4. #44

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    How do you guys feel about fresh caught being cut up for sushi? I salmon fish a lot in the fall. I have often wondered about cutting sashemi from fish caught that day and eating it. Is this a no no due to parasites and such?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Davis View Post
    How do you guys feel about fresh caught being cut up for sushi? I salmon fish a lot in the fall. I have often wondered about cutting sashemi from fish caught that day and eating it. Is this a no no due to parasites and such?
    I actually don't think that you have to worry that much.

  6. #46
    Same problem. The parasites are in the flesh of the fish.

    It will certainly be one of the freshest pieces of fish you could eat, although the flesh could be too soft if the fish hasn't gone into rigor mortis, or too hard if you try to eat it after it has just gone into rigor mortis. That's why many pieces of fish are actually "aged" to let the flesh relax before cutting and serving for sashimi/sushi. But, the threat of parasites is still there.

    Parasites are not the result of handling, they're the result of where the fish has been, eaten, been exposed to. Bacteria are more of an issue of handling. But, freshness doesn't get rid of parasites; once they're in the flesh, they're in there.

    I'll be going to the LA Downtown fish markets this weekend. If I can find a really fresh fish, i.e. one that's in rigor mortis, I'll cut it down to see if there are any parasites. If there are no visible parasites, I'll cure a piece in salt to see if any come out.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

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