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Thread: Possible Lamson Collaboration Line of Knives

  1. #321
    No offense on the dragon pic, but I kind of hate that clash of patina against none. I'm sure it is a love it or hate it thing, it's just not for me and I love dragons.
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  2. #322
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    Seeing it pictured I'm not keen on it either.

  3. #323
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paradox View Post
    Seeing it pictured I'm not keen on it either.
    Me neither. Far too abrupt.
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  4. #324
    Senior Member Notaskinnychef's Avatar
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    i love patina, and the concept of having contrast is certainly appealing, but having such a dark and bold patina (without the metalic hues and such) makes it seem a bit too harsh imo

  5. #325
    Gentlemen, food for though. From a construction point of view first.

    Bolsters. An issue has been raised with galvanic reaction. Copper if not cared for could likely turn dark, then green. You have voiced an objection to stainless. Fair enough. I would like to suggest bronze. It is a mix of brass and tin, as you know, and would be less likely to turn then copper, or straight brass. Thoughts?

    Pins. Or as far as a produced knife goes, rivets. There are a few sizes, essentially, the smallest is .1875 in dia. Issue with the pins/rivets is color match to the bolsters. I believe there are brass, stainless, and maybe nickel/silver. No copper, no bronze.

    Potential configuration. In my minds eye, I think bronze bolsters, and cocobolo would look sweet, and unique. The pin issue can be as simple as nothing visible. Blind/hidden pins are a possible answer.

    The issue is... When constructing a knife in mass numbers, the more a knife, or component is handled, the cost rises. So for example lets take a knife through the steps.
    1. profiles are computer fitted to a sheet to yield as little waste as possible.
    2. cut out by precision laser.
    3. Heat treated
    4. ground, and polished to desired finish
    5. in another part of the shop, the handle scales are profiled and drilled/countersunk to receive the rivets. Bolsters have been CNC machined to desired profile, and drilled to accept the pins.
    6. bolsters are epoxied/pinned/pressed into place
    7. Scales are epoxied, rivets placed, scales checked to ensure a tight fit, then the rivets are pressed to secure them. And laid aside to cure.
    7b. scales are epoxied, pinned/clamped, by hand and laid aside to cure. (much more time and hands on here)
    8. Handle is trimmed, shaped, and polished.
    8b. pins are trimmed flush, handle is trimmed, shaped and polished

    It doesn't sound like much of a difference, but to clamp ( 2 clamps per knife) 80 or so knives would take a considerable amount of time. Its not out of the question, but would add cost and is a PITA in terms of production.

    Now this post will be a surprise to Tom, as he has been busy today. So I apologize if this post is out of turn, or not along the projects vision. Just options, and an explanation of how the knife will be built. Reading how it will come together, will dispel some ideas we may have of possible options. Remember, these are not customs. We want to build a solid, aesthetically pleasing knife, out of quality materials, for a low price, that will be acceptable to the group as a whole.

    As an added FYI, I was speaking to my steel guy today, and talking of new things coming down the pipe. He informed me on the composition of the O1 we will be using, and chemically speaking, it will sit squarely between white 1, and blue 2. It is a very clean smelt, and will produce an excellent carbon steel knife. I am excited to be part of this project.

    Also, Lamson is taking interest in this thread, and has read it from end to end!

    Thanks for your time!

    Pierre


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  6. #326
    my 2 cents.... I don't like the look of a stainless bolster with a carbon knife.

    My vote is for the carbon knife, use a solid scales with no bolster then revisit having a stainless bolster vs none for the stainless version.

  7. #327
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Sup Lamson?
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  8. #328
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    Quote Originally Posted by PierreRodrigue View Post
    agreed. So we are thinking stainless, with a brushed/satin finish. Also, after a few conversations today, We need to ask you guys how you feel about rosewood as an option? Lamson has wenge, rosewood, and cocobolo on hand. Tom and I think Rosewood might be the way to go. Could as many of you who want to voice an opinion please weigh in on this?

    I had a long talk with Lamson today. Things are moving forward in a positive way!

    Thanks guys.
    Vintage American Knife and Lamson I think Rosewood.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  9. #329
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    I have spoken!
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  10. #330
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    Pierre, thanks for the detail. Would a wa-handle reduce complexity? And thus reducing potential issues and cost? Though Lamson does have experience with western handles, so we can assume a level of proficiency, no?

    The O1 composition sounds very interesting.

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