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Thread: History on Forgecraft knives; please educate me

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    sachem allison's Avatar
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    1. this is and 8in late 60's towards end of production flowing thin script with pronounced full curly tail on the g. larger copyright r. thick behind the edge and not as well ground.

    2. this is a 10" early 60's flowing thin script slightly smaller Hi carbon print and smaller copyright r, g tail missing( at first I thought this was just a poor strike or the g wore away but, I have seen this a lot and it is always consistent with this batch.) thin behind the edge and beautifully ground

    3. this is from a mid 50's cleaver the stamp is bolder the script slightly different and about 20% smaller then other logos, better quality strike and a different full curly tail on the g. thin behind the edge and beautifully ground.

    4. This one is from a 10 in early 1950's The stamp is deeply struck, much crisper and of a better quality it is about 20% smaller then the later model ones and has a distinctive tail on the g. Thin behind the edge and the best ground.

    The olde ones are better struck and better ground in my opinion. I contribute the loss of quality to an aging work force and modernization. As the company got closer to its end they let the highly skilled more experienced workers go and just sorta phoned in the rest with the newbs.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  2. #22
    A very big THANK YOU to you Son and the forum members for all the help and info.

    Hoss

  3. #23
    Senior Member Jmadams13's Avatar
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    Yeah Son, thanks a bunch. I've actually copied and pasted your replies Sony could save them for reverence later. You the man, man..
    "This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.. Beer!" -Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves, Friar Tuck

  4. #24
    Son, thanks so much for the info and pics on forgecraft. I've recently piced up a couple, and just love 'em. I tried to find some history on the brand, but came up empty handed. Thanks again.

    One of mine came incredibly thick behind the edge, and looks completely flat ground on both sides. The second is much thinner behind the edge, almost like it has thinned out over the years. I'll check for the differences in logo, as you posted. Both 10" chefs.

  5. #25
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    There was a batch I want to say around the late 60's towards the end of production that was relatively thick and flat sided usually 8 in. size. I suspect that this actually was one specific person who was grinding out the blades and just either wasn't trained properly or just didn't care. you can actually tell knives ground by the same person over the years. I have had some from the 40's to the mid 60's that was ground by the same person, you can tell by the grind, the way the tip is shaped or the heel is ground, little fingerprints so, to speak. I instantly can tell because it is so much better than the others. I'm sending 2 to Devin to look at and I think they may be from the same person or someone he trained. Over the years I have come across about a dozen that were very thick almost slab sided and usually over ground, they all look fairly identical and may very well have been made by the same guy or gal. THey usually date within the last 5 years of production. Now keep in mind many of the nos that is being found out there was not necessarily made on the 60's. The knives could have been sitting in the warehouses for decades before it was sold and then sat in the restaurant supply house for decades more. Things would have gotten mixed up and turned around so, its a crap shoot. These are rough guess estimates only based on years of experience.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  6. #26
    Thank you son for that - I had three 10" Forgecrafts and two look to be ground by the same guy. They each have a certain mark in the exact same place. Great knives really and so much fun to convert.

  7. #27
    Senior Member RoanRoks29's Avatar
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    Thank you for this fountain of knowledge !! Very Interesting story behind these knives!!!

  8. #28
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Son's last post is especially true. The one that I sold to Huw is one of the finest vintage grinds I've seen/used. Karring's is my all-time favourite, though.

    Sorry I missed this thread. I'm sitting in Starbucks, trying to cram for a classification exam and here I am reading through this. Haha. As for Old Hickory, I have two bullnoses by them that are maybe, just maybe superior to Forgecraft. Beautiful, heavy nosed knives. Man, I love vintage carbon.
    09/06

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  9. #29
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    I just checked eBay for the first time in a about 3 weeks. Only found one lot with a questionable 10 inch chefs. Last fall there was somewhere around 15-20 at any given time. And they were CHEAP- $20-40. I looked again sometime in the middle of January they were averaging $60-70!

    Maybe I won't sell that Stefan handled Forge after all...
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  10. #30
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Time I get a handle on my own which was a generous gift by Mike H. Just wondering, what is the wood on these oldies, does anybody know? I want to rehandle mine but I want to stay with the American theme - had some old wormy American chestnut stabilized, and when done it may look just as it does right now... Maybe I'll throw a touch of redwood in there.

    Stefan

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