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Thread: discoloring of onions, blackness

  1. #41
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    I am not sure if this will work for the knife in question, but this method does work well for all of my carbon knives. When I get a new knife I scrub any patina off with Comet after each use, after some time it will stop forming patina, or at a very slowed rate, and essentially prevent bad reactions with food. The white2 gyuto I have been using for everything lately shows almost no patina, does not react badly, and it has been months since I have scrubbed any patina off.

    It does help to keep a damp towel next to your board for wiping the blade.

  2. #42


    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    "Tojiro Shirogami"

    I've had a few of these roll through the shop, they've all been rusty and stinky. The owners all asked what to do about this and I advised to buy a new knife because I can't believe the problem will stop. I feel the cladding is just too reactive for use as a kitchen knife.

  3. #43
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    JBroida's Avatar
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    not to sound like a broken record here, but i've used all variety of knives in both home and professional environments (including cheap carbon and very reactive knives)... if you work like i explain in the video, its not really a problem. Stainless makes your life easier, as do less reactive carbons, but pretty much anything should be fine if you pay attention to what you do.

    -Jon

  4. #44
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
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    I'm not sure what the steel is, but the Suien gyuto I got from Jon has been surprisingly unreactive. I do wipe it down regularly, but it really is an easy going carbon. I just touched it up before dinner and took the patina off the edge, and the first onion discolored just a little bit. But after that, it was back to normal. Cut some tomatoes and a lime, then had to walk away and grab the kid in a hurry. The knife sat with lime juice for several minutes and there was no noticeable reaction.
    Whatever it is, this carbon is great.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Chef Doom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chefdog View Post
    I'm not sure what the steel is, but the Suien gyuto I got from Jon has been surprisingly unreactive. I do wipe it down regularly, but it really is an easy going carbon. I just touched it up before dinner and took the patina off the edge, and the first onion discolored just a little bit. But after that, it was back to normal. Cut some tomatoes and a lime, then had to walk away and grab the kid in a hurry. The knife sat with lime juice for several minutes and there was no noticeable reaction.
    Whatever it is, this carbon is great.
    +1. I am also a big fan of this knife. My experience is very similar to yours. It's an impressive steel for what it is. I'm going to start recommending this knife as a budget knife in the future.

    My recommendation for the OP is to follow Jon's advice along with getting a better quality knife from a different maker if he really wants to stick with carbon. Sometimes in life you have to up the ante in order to come out ahead.
    "Into a country where the jails are full, and the mad houses closed." - Charles Bukowski

  6. #46
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    +1 to what Jon said.

    However, the other thing that I've noticed really cuts down / eliminates over-reactivity is etching.
    Shigefuesa is notorious for using a very soft and very reactive iron cladding and this completely stopped the stinking on mine.

    Here's a great post from Dave:
    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...-amp-Re-Etchng

    Can can also try soaking it in hot (boiling) white vinegar if you want to just try something simple that you likely have lying around the house first:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRtEPDzCa2A
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

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