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Thread: Considering taking a class in charcuterie

  1. #11
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    I could be mistaken. It's been about three years since I referenced that book. I was using multiple books/online resources back then. I do agree that they are solid recipes. But maintain that they're a bit difficult to resize.
    Today is as good a day to die as any. Except for tomorrow. I have plans tomorrow.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    I'll extend the same offer to you sir. I'm typing up a little course for Mike, and I can easily cut'n paste and send it in your direction. Maybe I'll start a charcuterie thread with some basic instructional info...
    I think that is a badass idea, count me in I already make my own cheese, Can't wait to have my own prosciutto with it

  3. #13
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    +1 on a basic charcuterie thread.

  4. #14
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    +1 on a basic charcuterie thread.
    +1 on the +1

    =D

  5. #15
    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Igasho View Post
    I think that is a badass idea, count me in I already make my own cheese, Can't wait to have my own prosciutto with it
    Here's a link for the Duck Proscuitto recipe. It's well worth trying. Mucho Bucho posted a link here in the past about making your own drying/curing chamber so I'll leave a link for that as well. Oh and a +1 to the other +1's for starting a Charcuterie thread!

    http://ruhlman.com/2009/03/duck-prosciutto/

    http://www.sausagemaker.com/tutorial...g_chamber.html
    Who you jivin' with that Cosmik Debris?

  6. #16
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    Charcuterie thread would be awesome! My limited attempts (mostly from the Ruhlman book) have come out pretty good, but most are overly salty.

  7. #17
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    +1 for me as well. I've noticed that some of the recipes in the Ruhlman book have an unusually high salt ratio, the Guanciale in particular is at 7% salt in the cure.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    If the hardest thing we have to do is adjust salt in a recipe then we certainly are off to a very good start. Adjusting any seasoning or cure is going to be a part of the process to get to a result each that fits each individuals taste.
    Here's Ruhlmans Duck Proscuitto;

    2 Cups/450 grams Kosher salt or ** as needed
    Boneless Duck breast -about 1 pound-skin on, split
    1/2 teaspoon/1.5 grams white pepper
    Cheesecloth

    1) Put 1 cup/225 grams of the salt into a nonreactive baking pan or dish that will just hold the duck breasts with out touching and nestle the duck breasts skin side up on the salt (the snugger the fit, the less salt you'll need to use, but be sure the pieces don't touch each other). Pour enough additional salt over the duck breasts so that the pieces are completely covered. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate 24 hours.
    2)Remove the duck from the salt, rinse thoroughly, and pat completely dry with paper towels. The flesh should feel dense, and its color will have deepened. Dust the breasts on both sides with the white pepper.
    3) Wrap each breast in a layer of cheesecloth and tie with string. Hang the duck breasts for about 7 days in a cool humid place (about 50 to 60 degrees F./8to 15 degrees C. is optimal). The flesh should be stiff but not hard throughout; the color will be a deep rich red. If the breasts feel squishy (raw) in the center, hang for a day or two longer as needed.
    4) Remove the cheesecloth, wrap the duck in plastic wrap, and refrigerate until ready to use. The duck will keep for several weeks.
    Who you jivin' with that Cosmik Debris?

  9. #19
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    The masses have spoken! I'll bang out some basic sausage guidelines for the guys who said they were interested, and then start working on a basic curing outline for a thread- along with those sausage facts. I know there's a couple other guys on the forum that do this in a pro setting(Tkern, Chuckles, JohnnyChance, to name a few), so it should be a fun constantly evolving thread.
    Today is as good a day to die as any. Except for tomorrow. I have plans tomorrow.

  10. #20
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    i've only mostly followed ruhlman's book charcuterie. so basically all i know is what's in there.

    this should be interesting.

    i would love to learn more about salumi, more on italian type stuff.

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