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Thread: Considering taking a class in charcuterie

  1. #41
    Looking forward to this as well. Please add me to your PM list.


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  2. #42
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    I love this idea!! Add me to the PM list too please.

  3. #43
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    Here is one you don't find very often in the states, unless you go to China town. Asia has a great sausage tradition and one of my favorites is a dried smoked sweet sausage called lap cheong. It is often times served diced up in fried rice or in bao's but, one of my favorite ways to eat it is sauteed up wit some onions garlic and Chinese black mushrooms. I also love it charred on a grill with and ice cold tsing tao. oooh! and sticky rice mixed with boiled peanuts scallions, lap cheong and oyster sauce.
    This is a recipe I modified and developed at SavorNy when I was the Chef there.



    Lap Cheong
    Chinese sausage is a dried, hard sausage usually made from pork meat and a high content of fat. This sausage is normally smoked, sweetened, and seasoned. Chinese sausage formulations are unique, based on a long tradition. Ingredients such as monosodium glutamate, soy sauce and sugar are added to the sausages in very high levels. This is because there was no refrigeration until fairly recently and meat is used more as a condiment or flavor enhancer rather then a major portion of the meal. The addition of selected Chinese rice wines or even scotch or sherry are common for certain quality products.

    Meats............................................. .......... Metric..... US
    pork butt (If using lean pork or lean pork trimmings add 30% of back fat)....... 1000 g..... 2.20 lb.
    Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of meat

    Chinese rice wine or brandy ................... 40g..... 8tsp
    soy sauce ............................................. 40g..... 8tsp
    salt .................................................. .... 23g..... 4tsp
    cure#1 ................................................. 2.5g..... 1/2tsp
    brown sugar ......................................... 40g..... 8tsp
    sugar .................................................. . 10g..... 2tsp
    ground star anise ................................... 2g..... 1tsp
    ground cinnamon ................................... 2g..... 1 tsp
    ground Sichuan pepper............................ 2g..... 1tsp

    Instructions
    1. Grind pork and back fat through ⅜” plate (10 mm).
    2. Mix all ingredients with meat.
    3. Stuff firmly into hog or sheep casings 18-26 mm and form 5-6” (15 cm) long links.
    4. Ferment at 38º C (100º F) for 12 hours, 90-85% humidity.
    5. Apply light smoke at 45º C (115º F), 70% humidity for 6 hours. The sausage is still fermenting (F-LC culture is able to produce lactic acid at this temperature).
    6. Gradually increase smoke temperature until internal meat temperature becomes 154º F (68º C).
    7. Store sausages at 10-15º C (50-59º F), 75% humidity.
    Notes
    The traditional Chinese way, still applied today, is a time consuming operation of cutting meat by hand into small cubes. Chinese are fond of using MSG (monosodium glutamate), but it may be removed from the recipe. it has been removed in this recipe.

    Hope you guys enjoy it.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  4. #44
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
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    Sachem , are these the skinny links hanging in the windows in Chinatown or down Main St in Queens? They used to be a treat.

  5. #45
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    Thanks for sharing the lap cheong recipe, Son.

  6. #46
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrmnms View Post
    Sachem , are these the skinny links hanging in the windows in Chinatown or down Main St in Queens? They used to be a treat.
    yep
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  7. #47
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    I've been making a lot of bacon and beef jerky lately. Also, started to make cured & smoked beef sticks as well. My coworkers love this stuff, I can't make enough. There are quite a few simple kits that make the process easier these days. I am probably going to make a canadian bacon log soon (basically cured pork loin). When I finally retire and am able to settle in one place, I'll start doing a dry aged sausage. Let's keep this thread going!
    Jason

  8. #48
    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    Have you been smoking the bacon on the BGE?

  9. #49
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    I've beem very making charcutterie for years. Ruhlman's book does expose the art but is hardly the last word. Personally my sausage bible is http://www.amazon.com/Home-Productio.../dp/0982426739



    Makde these fresh sausages this weekend



    Chourico Cured sausages



    Pancetta



    For sausage Forumlas Len Poli is the gold standard

    http://lpoli.50webs.com/Sausage%20recipes.htm

    I've made hams, tons of cured sausages, slim jims, aged jowls, aged bacon, smoked bellys... Let me know if you have any questions:

    Tool recomendation:
    A Porkert hand grinder #12 will be fine, you don't need electric unless your doing tons of product




    To stuff the sausage get a 5 pound or more vertical sausage stuffer
    Use only natural casings (Butcher Packer)

    Get some Sodium Erythrobate, Dextrose, AmesPhos or FAB will go a long way to improve texture, moisture and taste.

    Good luck. Oink Oink

  10. #50
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    My newest toy: Vacuum tumblet


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