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Thread: Considering taking a class in charcuterie

  1. #51
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Some white and hungarian sausage



    Chamber slmost full


  2. #52
    Nice meat, bro Look at that flex! But on the real, you sausages look real pro.

  3. #53
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
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    looks great!

  4. #54
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Thanks Jay thats quite a complement coming from you. It was a cooking phase I went through. I'm not making cured meats much anymore but had to restock the freezer.

    I've been wanting to do a Chinese style Pig Ears. I haven't done that yet. I'm pretty sure its a terrine. Does anybody have a recipe for that one? Brainsausage/Sachem any ideas on an recipe/approach for Chinese Pig Ears?

  5. #55
    Great stuff, might have to try this in the future.
    Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries. Now go away you silly man or I shall taunt you a second time!

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    Thanks Jay thats quite a complement coming from you. It was a cooking phase I went through. I'm not making cured meats much anymore but had to restock the freezer.

    I've been wanting to do a Chinese style Pig Ears. I haven't done that yet. I'm pretty sure its a terrine. Does anybody have a recipe for that one? Brainsausage/Sachem any ideas on an recipe/approach for Chinese Pig Ears?
    are you talking the head cheese style pigs ears and snout with peppercorns and gelatin?
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  7. #57
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    Here is a classic Vietnamese version of Pig ears and snout. I love this one.



    Gio Thu (Vietnamese Headcheese)




    4 Pig Ears
    2 Pig Tongues
    2 Snouts or Cheeks or both
    2 1/2 tbsps Fish Sauce
    2 1/2 tbsps Sugar
    1 tbsp Salt
    1 tsp ground pepper
    2 tbsps roasted whole Peppercorns (tiêu hột)
    1 cup shredded or whole Black Fungus (nấm mèo) soaked for about 20 minutes or until soft and drained
    Cooking Oil
    6 Cloves Garlic, minced (make about 2 1/2 tbsps minced garlic)
    2 Shallots, minced
    1 medium Onion, for boiling meat
    1 tbsp Salt, for boilling meat
    2 tbsp Sugar, for boiling meat
    *
    *
    2 tablespoos of Salt, for cleaning the meat
    1 cup Vinegar, for cleaning the meat
    *
    *
    2 empty medium size round tin cans (empty fruit cans) and plastic sandwich bags
    *
    *
    Preparing Meat


    Clean the pig ears, tongue, snout with water, salt and vinegar thorougly. Rinsed. scrub it good.
    Boil meat in a large pot with onion, sugar and salt for about 45 minutes or until you can poke a choptick through the pig ears, tongue and snout . Drain and rinse cold water until cool. This will prevent the skin of the pork from turning color.
    Cut the pig ears thinly.
    Discard the thin white layer on top of the tongue by using the slicer to slice it. Cut tongue thinly.
    Certain part of the snout might still has hair, so be sure to shave it clean. Cut snout thinly.

    Mix the meat in a bowl with ground pepper, whole peppercorns, sugar, salt, fish sauce and fungus.


    In a large pan, heat a couple tablespoons of cooking oil and saute the shallots and garlic until it becomes fragrant. Add the meat mixture and saute until you notice the meats become viscous sticky, usually about 10 minutes.


    Molding the Mixture



    use empty ridge-free walls fruit cans such as the jackfruit or lychee cans. Line the cans with sandwich bags and tightly pack the cans with the mixture. Every spoon of mixture you add in the mold, press it down firmly to compact the mixture. Close the bag then place something heavy on top to compact the contents further. Store in the fridge overnight.

    Remove it from a mold and wrap it up in banana leaves or plastic wrap and aluminum foil.
    Keep refrigerated until ready to use, serve in sandwich
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  8. #58
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    The differences in the Chinese version is that you would use soy sauce instead of fish sauce, add star anise, cinnamon and maybe some orange zest oh and lots of msg.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  9. #59
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckfat View Post
    Have you been smoking the bacon on the BGE?
    No, I use a "tube" in my Webber. I've been cold smoking my beef jerky as well (although only for 1 hour, versus 8 hours for the bacon).
    Jason

  10. #60
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    OMG Sachem, I'm going to do it. Do you think that it would work finishing in bain marie or sous vide might work as opposed to stove top? That way I could put the mixture in terrine pan and vac seal, then sous vide? Maybe at 129 degrees for 12hrs? Then rapid cool. Either way, this isn't the recipe I was thinking about.

    The version of Chinese Pig Ears i'm thinking about is more like braised shingled ears cooking in a hosin base sauce. The ears are then slices cross-section very thin.

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