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Thread: Pronounciations

  1. #11
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    One difficult one is Suisin because of spelling. Suisin should be 'Suishin' with a 'shhh'

    Suisin: soo-ee-sheen
    yep. this is because of writing in japanese is confusing.

    you can't write the name suisin in japanese, it's spelled suishin in japanese. and should be pronounced as such.


    like the way mazda is spelled in japanese. it's spelled as matsuda, not mazda.

    "tsu" and "zu" can be interchangeable sometimes in pronounciation, sometimes it's regional (i think) on how it's pronounced.

    the japanese kept the name mazda in romaji (what they call roman writing or western writing) coz it's easier for westerners to pronounce mazda than matsuda.

    again the "u" in matsuda is silent, which is why sounds like mazda or matsda when pronounced.

  2. #12
    The Japanese language is based on a phonetic alphabet. Every pronounced syllable in a Japanese word is generally a different character, and, unlike English, the sounds don't change (although the accent or emphasis may). So, "ke" is always going to be "keh" and "ki" is always going to be "kee" (like "tree" but not as long of a "e" sound).

    So, Takeda should be pronounced "Ta-ke-da", i.e. "tah" (like "ta-da"), "keh" (the "ke" sound in "Ken" and "da" (the "dah" sound in "ta-da"). There is no "tuh" character in Japanese although there may be regional pronunciations (of which I am not aware of because Takeda is a relatively common name in Japan).

    Also, Japanese does not have many long sounding syllables so "nay" as that sound is pronounced in US English is long compared to the Japanese character for that sound which is more like "neh."
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by franzb69 View Post
    yep. this is because of writing in japanese is confusing.

    you can't write the name suisin in japanese, it's spelled suishin in japanese. and should be pronounced as such.


    like the way mazda is spelled in japanese. it's spelled as matsuda, not mazda.

    "tsu" and "zu" can be interchangeable sometimes in pronounciation, sometimes it's regional (i think) on how it's pronounced.

    the japanese kept the name mazda in romaji (what they call roman writing or western writing) coz it's easier for westerners to pronounce mazda than matsuda.

    again the "u" in matsuda is silent, which is why sounds like mazda or matsda when pronounced.
    The "tsu" and "zu" characters are completely different in Japanese. In Japanese, it looks like it's spelled "ma-tsu-da" in Katakana so it is definitely not "zu." And, in Japan, it's definitely pronounced "ma-tsu-da." The "u" is clearly pronounced in my experience in Japan. Also, whether or not a sound is silent or not can simply depend on the speed one says a word.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  4. #14
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    So is it true as I have been told that the 'u' in Matsushita is almost silent because the vowel is pronounced so fast that it's sort of rushed over?

  5. #15
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    The "tsu" and "zu" characters are completely different in Japanese. In Japanese, it looks like it's spelled "ma-tsu-da" in Katakana so it is definitely not "zu." And, in Japan, it's definitely pronounced "ma-tsu-da." The "u" is clearly pronounced in my experience in Japan. Also, whether or not a sound is silent or not can simply depend on the speed one says a word.
    my mistake then...

    i guess it is just the speed then, and it usually comes out like i mentioned earlier, "almost silent".

    So is it true as I have been told that the 'u' in Matsushita is almost silent because the vowel is pronounced so fast that it's sort of rushed over?
    it's only what i've learned on my own... from watching japanese movies and tv shows (j-dramas) for close to 20 years.

  6. #16
    Same with "Matsushita." The "i" is part of the "shi" character and is pronounced "she", not "sh." It's not silent. If it were, it would be pronounced "ma-tsu-sh-ta", which it's not.
    Michael
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  7. #17
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    Same with "Matsushita." The "i" is part of the "shi" character and is pronounced "she", not "sh." It's not silent. If it were, it would be pronounced "ma-tsu-sh-ta", which it's not.
    from the example of what i posted on the link earlier (audio playback of someone pronouncing the name matsushita), from what clearly sounds like a native speaker, it was like i mentioned almost silent. like my english (it not being perfect), my japanese is even worse than my english.

    but whatever. if i'm wrong, then i'm wrong. =D

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Sambal View Post
    So is it true as I have been told that the 'u' in Matsushita is almost silent because the vowel is pronounced so fast that it's sort of rushed over?
    It's pronounced, although quickly. The "tsu" sound is one character. It's not a "ts" sound; it's "tsooh" but shorter.

    It may be that it sounds silent based on the sounds heard in other languages and how such sounds are spelled. But, spelling-wise, it's the character for "tsu" and it's pronounced "tsu" in Japanese.

    As for how "Matsushita" is pronounced, based on how my cousin pronounced it when I saw him last year, and considering he works for Matsushita in Osaka, I would say the "u" is pronounced as part of the "tsu" sound.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  9. #19
    Yes, but this is not most important. In principle, Japanese has no natural stresses of syllables, like Spanish for example. So anyone understands Konosuke as 'koh-no-soo-kay' even if some stresses naturally happen and a u can be 'eaten' when people speak, like desu become 'des' and mashita is usually 'mashtah'. Just remember: a='ah' like 'Bah' Humbug, e='ay' like 'say', i='ee' like 'see', o='oh' like the US anthem, and u='oo' or 'ou' like 'you'

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Patatas Bravas View Post
    Yes, but this is not most important. In principle, Japanese has no natural stresses of syllables, like Spanish for example. So anyone understands Konosuke as 'koh-no-soo-kay' even if some stresses naturally happen and a u can be 'eaten' when people speak, like desu become 'des' and mashita is usually 'mashtah'. Just remember: a='ah' like 'Bah' Humbug, e='ay' like 'say', i='ee' like 'see', o='oh' like the US anthem, and u='oo' or 'ou' like 'you'
    Sorry! This is responding to a previous post and so I lost context. Anyway, I agree with all Michael said.

    With the 'ts' as in 'tsu' or つ / ツ in English you say this all the time so not hard, for example if you have 'pits' and drop the ˈpɪ' and keep the 'ts and add 'u:' you have 'tsu' or つ / ツ.

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