Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Sharpening stones: Is bigger better???

  1. #1
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Outside the Beltway
    Posts
    526

    Question Sharpening stones: Is bigger better???

    I've decided to give diamond plates a try for sharpening and I'm going to buy 9 & 3micron DMT plates to see how I like them. I was going to get the 8x3" plates because they're essentially the same size as most water stones, will fit my stone holder and they're slightly less expensive than the other plates (and were the only size with the 3mic grit). But, Marko has been talking up the 11.5x2.5" plates and has a special order going to get the 3 micron plates in this size. Having a bigger surface to sharpen on theoretically allows for fewer strokes, reducing the effects of wobble and getting your knives sharpened faster. Also, it makes sharpening larger knives slightly easier, although I only have one blade longer than 240.

    SO, what do you guys think about the bigger stones? It makes sense, but at the same time, almost all good quality water stones are sold in 8x3" sizes. Is this just a function of cost and convenience or is there another reason you don't see larger stones more often? Are professional sharpeners using larger stones, while the rest of us get the standard size? Is there a true practical advantage for someone who's only sharpening his own knives, and is accustomed to and proficient with standard size water stones?

    I want to give the longer stones a try, but they're roughly $50 more, would require me to make or buy a new stone holder, and I could buy one of Marko's strops with the leftover cash.

    So what's your opinion and experience on this??? Pre-buy ends tonight, so tell me what you think.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    228
    I have 8x3 DMT's and they're fine. I think I would prefer having the 3" width over more length. It all depends on your style though. If you are usually on regular size waterstones, a technique change part way through your stone progression to accommodate a longer stone may not be a good idea from a consistency standpoint.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Outside the Beltway
    Posts
    526
    Quote Originally Posted by Squilliam View Post
    I have 8x3 DMT's and they're fine. I think I would prefer having the 3" width over more length. It all depends on your style though. If you are usually on regular size waterstones, a technique change part way through your stone progression to accommodate a longer stone may not be a good idea from a consistency standpoint.
    That's a good point that I overlooked. I guess it would require at least a slight change to adjust to the longer stone.

  4. #4
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SIngapore
    Posts
    510
    Just my views

    1. I tend to use shorter strokes as it gives better consistency for

    a)as you push it away, the angle tends to get higher and pressure is also less

    b) shorter strokes are great for better control

    c) longer strokes ( for me at least) is just to even out the uneveness when you sharpen part by part ( say blade divided into 3 parts)

    d) Due to the profile of the knife, near the heel is thicker adn normally requires more work. As of the tip, due to it being angled, it has to be worked separately. Hence requirement for shorter strokes

    e)Due to my stones rarely being absolutely flat, I tend to use it half side . Push cut into the stone to teh center of stone for the lower half of stone as it goes into teh dish adn thus a lower angle. The top side (or half) cut into stone till the middle part so as to terminate at a lower angle. The reverse is true shld I desire to finish at a higher angle

    I wld also prefer a wider stone as the contact area wld be wider ; no wider than my 4 fingers spread across the blade as that is where I exert the pressure on the blade and that's where the steel removal takes place the most in view of the pressure being directly applied, given the grit used.

    IF money is no objection... do what ever pleases you.

    Have fun and stay sharp.

    rgds

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    1,486
    The King 105 - 1000 stone is massive 330mm x 100mm x 80mm.114.00 on E-Bay--same stone 78.00 on Rakuton.Used one of these for yrs. at work.Height worn down fr. 80mm to 48mm.

    JKI sells a 1000 Gesshin another large stone 225mm x 90mm x 60mm

    These large stone work fine in a work situation,one thing to keep in mind it takes longer to flatten these.As Zitangy mentioned the sharpening is being done where your fingerpad pressure is so a larger stone face will not ness. sharpen your knives faster.For home use these stones may last longer than you will

  6. #6
    Aren't the Atoma plates generally preferred? I'm just curious why someone might chose DMT over Atoma.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Outside the Beltway
    Posts
    526
    Quote Originally Posted by Patatas Bravas View Post
    Aren't the Atoma plates generally preferred? I'm just curious why someone might chose DMT over Atoma.
    $$$$$

    Keith,
    We're talking about DMT plates, so flattening isn't a concern. I was just trying to see what people thought about using larger (longer) stones vs regular size ones.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    1,148
    For me , the extra stone size can only be an advantage, not a problem. Compared to a lot of water stones and based on their durabilty, they represent a good value. It's also an opportunity to support a respected member by voting with my wallet. I ordered 2 large DMT's and a walnut base from Marko.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bay Area
    Posts
    664
    I see the extra length as a benefit too, though I admit that my knife sharpening experience is quite limited. I made a 11.5" x 2.5" cardboard cut out and went through the sharping and stropping motions to see if there were going to be obvious issues or flaws with the plan. After making the mock-up, I thought that the larger size would work quite well.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Outside the Beltway
    Posts
    526
    Quote Originally Posted by Mrmnms View Post
    For me , the extra stone size can only be an advantage, not a problem. Compared to a lot of water stones and based on their durabilty, they represent a good value. It's also an opportunity to support a respected member by voting with my wallet. I ordered 2 large DMT's and a walnut base from Marko.
    I'm definitively supportive of Marko, and you helped me do it Mike!! I like that he's hooking up opportunities like this for all of us. There's nothing wrong with having more choices, except I have an even harder time making up my damn mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by don View Post
    I see the extra length as a benefit too, though I admit that my knife sharpening experience is quite limited. I made a 11.5" x 2.5" cardboard cut out and went through the sharping and stropping motions to see if there were going to be obvious issues or flaws with the plan. After making the mock-up, I thought that the larger size would work quite well.
    I was "sharpening" on an egg carton this morning to approximate the long stones. I didn't really come to any conclusions, other than my egg carton is really dished

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •