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Thread: Polished vs. toothy edges

  1. #1
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    Polished vs. toothy edges

    The common (though not unanimous) wisdom out there seems to be that a highly polished edge will last longer than a toothy one. Can someone explain why this would be so. And does anyone disagree? Assuming it's true, is the difference significant?

    Also, has anyone had luck with a very highly refined edge going through tomatoes easily (as opposed to a toothy one, which many seem to think works better for tomato skins).

  2. #2
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Different edges for different knives. Yanagi = polished, gyuto = toothy. GYuto is for a variety of products and cutting techniques so it needs a toothy edge in order to perform well. Yanagi is made for slicing raw protein so a polished edge will make cleaner slices and last longer. A polished edge on a gyuto doesn't last long at all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    A polished edge on a gyuto doesn't last long at all.
    I'm sorry, but that doesn't make any intuitive sense to me. Clearly you don't mean there is anything about the shape of the gyuto (vs. e.g., a yanabi) that would make this so. Are you saying that because gyutos have to tackle many different types of foods, it is likely to have an edge that doesn't last as long as a single-purpose knife like a yanagi? If so, it doesn't logically follow that a polished edge wouldn't last as long as a toothy one.

    I'm not saying I disagree with you (you clearly know more than I do, and I'm coming into this knowing nothing), but I'm not following your explanation.

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    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    I find when I polish my gyutos to mirror finishes they literally lose degrees of sharpness with each board contact or rough contact with even a vegetable. I prefer about 5k finish on mine. My vg10 lasts longer than my white #2 when polished as well. I strop my slicers super high always. They don't get as much board contact so their delicate edges can stay sharp for longer.

    These are just my thoughts. I'm pretty much a novice web it comes to this stuff but..
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    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Gyutos have more board contact and have to cut through many different products with many different cutting techniques. Yanagi are only used it one direction through raw product. It has nothing to do with the shape. It's all about the product and technique. From experience I can tell you highly polished edges on gyuto fail near immediately upon use. Sure it's sharp as hell the first use, but it won't last at all.
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    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Gyutos have more board contact and have to cut through many different products with many different cutting techniques. Yanagi are only used it one direction through raw product. It has nothing to do with the shape. It's all about the product and technique. From experience I can tell you highly polished edges on gyuto fail near immediately upon use. Sure it's sharp as hell the first use, but it won't last at all.
    agreed
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Gyutos have more board contact and have to cut through many different products with many different cutting techniques. Yanagi are only used it one direction through raw product. It has nothing to do with the shape. It's all about the product and technique. From experience I can tell you highly polished edges on gyuto fail near immediately upon use. Sure it's sharp as hell the first use, but it won't last at all.
    Agree Yanagi's polishing stone,Gyuto's Med. stone between 1K & 2K,Sliced & Diced many cases of tomato's for Lomi Salmon wt. a Med. toothy edge.

  8. #8
    The coarser something is sharpened, the longer the edge will last.

    A polished edge is better for push cutting and a toothy edge is better for slice cutting.

    Hoss

  9. #9
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Devin makes an interesting point about the teeth. Think of it this way, under a microscope the teeth would look like a saw blade. The longer the teeth are the longer it takes to abrade them down to dull. If the teeth are very fine or refined/polished they are smaller so there is less material to wear away before reaching the dull state, so it happens faster.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    Devin makes an interesting point about the teeth. Think of it this way, under a microscope the teeth would look like a saw blade. The longer the teeth are the longer it takes to abrade them down to dull. If the teeth are very fine or refined/polished they are smaller so there is less material to wear away before reaching the dull state, so it happens faster.
    Now THAT makes sense.

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