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Thread: How do you decide that you've reached the ultimate sharpness a particular blade can attain?

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Tristan, I find that sectional sharpening really helped me work on my consistency but I do a variety of strokes depending on what seems to be working. I think the direction I stroke affects the way the knife cuts significantly.
    Makes sense though. I have noticed this as well. For a extremely exaggerated example, the way teeth on a saw are designed to cut in either a pull or push.

    So for a gyuto that one push cuts with, you would want to sharpen in one direction, and in say a suji, where you are making long pull cuts, the opposite way.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Makes sense though. I have noticed this as well. For a extremely exaggerated example, the way teeth on a saw are designed to cut in either a pull or push.

    So for a gyuto that one push cuts with, you would want to sharpen in one direction, and in say a suji, where you are making long pull cuts, the opposite way.
    Yeah, I think that's what I'm getting. I'm also thinking that a one-handed sharpening would yield a better all around edge than one that has been sharpened by switching hands. Again, I think I want to test this on an unsuspecting cook/chef and see if he notices. I'm afraid I might be "wanting" to see a difference and I'd rather eliminate that bias.

  3. #63
    You should try to get 2 or 3 identical knives, sharpen them differently, mark them, and let testers try them blind.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  4. #64
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    Yup. That's more or less the plan. Too bad you don't work nearby. You could be one of the guinea pigs.

  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Stephan: I didn't say stainless can't be fine grained. I cited AEB-L and powdered steels as examples of stainless with small or fairly small grain size, in general. I think it is safe to say that most stainless knives out there are med to large grained steel.
    Oh I agree, I was just trying to further the discussion along a path that generally doesn't get exposed when the discussion turns towards stainless vs. carbon

    I hate to see stainless all lumped together when there are truly spectacular examples available.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Stephan: I didn't say stainless can't be fine grained. I cited AEB-L and powdered steels as examples of stainless with small or fairly small grain size, in general. I think it is safe to say that most stainless knives out there are med to large grained steel.
    Hey on this line of thought, has any one had a Global suddenly chip on them while sharpening? I had this experience once and it scared the **** outta me cause I thought I damaged the knife or something. I later heard that it was due to the carbides of the steel being large grained and was wondering if this is the case?

  7. #67
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    How big was the "chip?" What stone were you using and what angles were you sharpening at? That explanation doesn't really sound reasonable to me. I'd guess it's more likely a defect in the blade.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    How big was the "chip?" What stone were you using and what angles were you sharpening at? That explanation doesn't really sound reasonable to me. I'd guess it's more likely a defect in the blade.
    I was using a Naniwa SS 5k. In preparation for going onto 10k.. I can't give an accurate number on the angle. I'd assume about 18 degress give or take the spine was prolly 3-5 mm off the stone. And the chip was not very big, about 3mm across. Thing is, it happened a few times, at different places along the edge. Good thing it was during some sharpening training that I did at a pro's shop.

  9. #69
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    Hmm. In my book, 3 mm is enormous... Large carbides might be around 0.1 mm across. That really doesn't sound right to me but I'm no expert. Really wierd. Was the owner surprised or did he think it was pretty normal?

  10. #70
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    It was actually a blade that was sent for sharpening to the guy that I'm practising my sharpening skills with, so the owner was not present. But according to the pro, it is not the first time that this has happened to a global. And I agree that 3mm was pretty large so I was kinda stunned.. He says that usually, the chips are not so large but still large enough to be seen with the naked eye. And I think the 3mm was a 1 off cause after that, I did see some shiny metal bits come off now and again but nothing as large. In the end, he did a 20* angle on it and also added a micro bevel...

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