Quantcast
$1000 popscicle - Page 3
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34

Thread: $1000 popscicle

  1. #21
    I too think custom knives are not overprice, considering the time it takes to make one.

  2. #22
    People at work always ask me how much my knives cost. I hardly ever tell them and I just have them guess. One picked up my red bone Nenox suji and he started the guessing at $150. Way off dude. Some people's absurd is another's normal.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Potato42's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    296
    I know of one custom maker that I think is on the pricey side, and that's Jay Fisher. $2k+ for a 440C blade? No thanks. If you want to laugh/or cry, go read about his "philosophy" of knifemaking. His reasoning for using 440C on everything is laughable. Then again if you're a collector and not a user, you can rest assured it probably wont rust sitting in your safe.
    - Sean

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    750
    Well I guess all that matters is if someone can afford it or not. Quite a while ago, I was in a love/hate relationship with my chef cos he could afford a Misono and I had to use some crappy stamped $15 knives. Now my peers are in a love/hate relationship with me cos I can afford J-knives and they are still using stamped $15 knives. It all depends on where you are in the world.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,435
    ... Certainly an interesting thread. I've often thought about this myself. I think that one of the things that makes knife value/prices confusing is that knives (kitchen knives in particular are tools) and, by most people, are viewed as such. Thus, their perceived value is seen as directly related to their performance. Like buying a cordless drill, there is a tangible, quantifiable, performance improvement with each level of price increase.

    As with all tools, there comes a point of diminishing returns where the ratio of price to improvement becomes steeper and steeper. However, where knives are different is there becomes a point where they become an artistic, emotionally charged item and then their value becomes based on the perception and emotional experience of the buyer and not any real tangible improvements in performance.

    Personally, I think that we can all agree (as Knuts) that makers like Rader, Thomas, Burke, Fowler ect are still basing their prices on tangible factors like thier time and material costs and the individualized performance of their knifes. However, as many have pointed out, there is very little tangible difference between their knives and thoes of Kramer. The prices that the eBay Kramers are going for are clearly based on emotional reaction.

    I don't know exactly how to phrase my point other than by saying that while logically, you'd think that something that is BOTH art and a highly functional tool, would be more highly valued / understandable than something that is JUST art, it seems to me that it actually makes it MORE confusing to people who can't understand it as both.

    So my question is this: at what price point do the tangible benefits end and emotional value totally take over?

    The last thing that I'll add goes to the idea of the relative value of money that some other folks brought up:
    The first kitchen knife that I bought as a kid was $20 and it was a HUGE investment: I had to save for a long time (poor family growing up). So if I extrapolate that out to my financial picture as an adult with a good job, an equivalent purchase would easily be in the 10's if not 100's of thousands of dollars.

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,111
    Whatever my functional versus emotional value tipping point is, the one thing I do wish is that the dollar were still worth more than the Canadian dollar so Pierre and Haslinger's knives would be cheaper.

    On the other hand all the Norwegian, Australian, and Canadian forum members are getting discounted American knives.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  7. #27
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Toronto/Canada
    Posts
    506
    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    Whatever my functional versus emotional value tipping point is, the one thing I do wish is that the dollar were still worth more than the Canadian dollar so Pierre and Haslinger's knives would be cheaper.

    On the other hand all the Norwegian, Australian, and Canadian forum members are getting discounted American knives.

    k.
    There isn't that much difference between Can $ and U.S $
    $1.04 U.S = $1.00 Can not that bad

    If I order anything from the States,not only do I pay shipping but I also get slapped with duties/tarrifs.Not much of a discount...

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,111
    True, but you are just measuring it against parity. For someone who has been used to non-parity pretty much his whole life there is a big difference. In 2001 it was around 1.60 CD to buy one USD, in 2004 it was around 1.30, 2006 it was 1.15. And with the exception of 2009 where it shot up into the 1.20s again, the CD has been worth more or has been near parity.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  9. #29
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Toronto/Canada
    Posts
    506
    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    True, but you are just measuring it against parity. For someone who has been used to non-parity pretty much his whole life there is a big difference. In 2001 it was around 1.60 CD to buy one USD, in 2004 it was around 1.30, 2006 it was 1.15. And with the exception of 2009 where it shot up into the 1.20s again, the CD has been worth more or has been near parity.

    k.
    ah,how the tables have turned...
    just kidding.even with a stronger Canadian $ we still pay more than you for almost everything,cars, beer,knives all the necessities of life.:biggrin2:

  10. #30
    I often think about how long knives last. It really hit me when I saw a giant outdoor knife in 3V, with a stabilized wood handle. That thing will be dug up in 2,000 years, and people will make assumptions about how it must have been used, or why it was made so well. It was just made for fun, because a guy had a huge bar of 3V he didn't need.

    The problem with these items, the reason people get upset by them, is because they bring up a class issue. Today, the classes divide where amounts of money stop mattering, and your wealth is a matter of how your money is moving, not how much it is. If you have $45billion, you don't have less things or quality of life than someone with $100 billion. But the world is finite, and that means that there is $55 billion dollars more that NOBODY else can have. It's like this:
    Is a $20,000 knife providing you with $20,000 worth of tool? No.
    Does it require $20,000 worth of time/effort to produce? No.
    Do people spend that anyways? Yep.

    Just FYI, I have a wife and 2 kids, and one of Bob Kramer's knives is worth my annual salary.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •