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Sujihiki Thickness
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Thread: Sujihiki Thickness

  1. #1

    Sujihiki Thickness

    So, with this knife it seems like there is some tension between the need for a slightly heavier knife so as not to be inclined to push down on delicate ingredients, and also the desire for a thin blade because, well because they are awesome. What do you guys see as the give and take as far as sujihiki geometry and what do you tend to prefer?

  2. #2
    quick question... when is the last time you had a knife wedge in a pliable piece of meat? Unless you are using your sujihiki for things that are hard and tall, spine thickness matters less than on other knives (not to say it doesnt matter at all, just not in the same way)

  3. #3
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
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    I prefer a fairly stiff suji with a little weight behind it, so that tends to mean a thicker knife. Im willing to put in a little extra time to grind away some steel to get it thinned a little behind the edge, in exchange for the stiffness. But I only use my suji for protiens, so I don't need an anorexic blade to get the job done.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    What do you want to cut?
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    quick question... when is the last time you had a knife wedge in a pliable piece of meat? Unless you are using your sujihiki for things that are hard and tall, spine thickness matters less than on other knives (not to say it doesnt matter at all, just not in the same way)
    Truth. My only worry is in cutting something like a pate or vegetables rolled in rice paper, if I want them to be cut really cleanly. I suppose the second is really dependent on the very edge, not the thickness of the whole blade, but what about a terrine or pate?

    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    What do you want to cut?
    see above. thanks.

  6. #6

  7. #7
    I've noticed that, but why?

  8. #8
    its dense and brittle... thinner moves though with less resistance, ergo less breakage. Also, keep the blade damp so it has less friction and sticking.

  9. #9
    much obliged.

  10. #10
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    Jon, are we not talking about the rice paper that is dipped in water and becomes very soft and foldable? It's not brittle at all once its ready to be used. If that's what the OP is going to be cutting, then some thickness won't hurt at all IMO.

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