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Thread: What constitutes a good sharpener?

  1. #21

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    I believe that recording (if possible) your sharpening session is very helpful. I was doing a movie about sharpening yanagiba for Polish knifes forum and after that session I have learned more than after all my previous sessions. I had to edit movie, analyse it, watch it 100 times. Now I can see my mistakes and can't wait for another session to fix my mistakes. I highly recommend it to people who have problems with sharpening.

  2. #22
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalaeb View Post
    If it works for you....
    I agree with this 100%. The way I sharpen probably isn't conventional but my knives perform exactly how I want them to so I see no reason to change. Knives are tools at the end of the day. It seems like sometimes people are scared of their knives

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    As you sharpen, the knife gets progressively thicker, and a relief bevel needs to be ground to restore performance. This illustration is from a good sharpening article by Chad Ward, http://forums.egullet.org/topic/2603...nd-sharpening/



    Note that many knives come OOTB needing to be thinned.
    Thanks to all that have replied. Not that I'm at the point of needing to do this yet, nor have the skill, but how does one go about it? Lowest grit stone?

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gravy Power View Post
    Thanks to all that have replied. Not that I'm at the point of needing to do this yet, nor have the skill, but how does one go about it? Lowest grit stone?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  5. #25
    Senior Member Chef Doom's Avatar
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    zitangy , you lost me around the second sentance. I gave up around half way through.
    "Into a country where the jails are full, and the mad houses closed." - Charles Bukowski

  6. #26
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    Honestly, SPEED is a big issue as well. I've worked in some hardcore places where I had to sharpen my knife 3-4 times a day. If it's taking you 10 min to sharpen your knife, something's wrong. Now, I find it annoying if people take 15min + to sharpen their knives (which I'm sure is very common cause that's how long it took me when I was getting started). I know it's fun, but you can't spend all day sharpening your knives man!

  7. #27
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Doom View Post
    zitangy , you lost me around the second sentance. I gave up around half way through.
    Hi

    What I am trying to say is that for most people, our senses are not fully heightened. Most people's senses are just average and we mainly use one of the them as our primary input

    You will use the three senses for sharpening :

    IF yours already is heightened.. yu will have a steeper learning curve. If not, then it can be developed.

    a)Touch: You need it to feel the sharpness and keeness, thickness of blade and the feedback off the stone, to realize teh amount of pressure that you are applying, teh feel when it cuts thru food or paper ( when testing) etc so that you can determine what you you need to do to attain the outcome.

    I really doubt that you can tell the sharpness of a knife just by looking at it.

    b)Hearing: ( sound) the scratchy sound of the burr from teh stone which will tell you that its almost done, the sound when you do a cut test say on paper.

    c)Eyes visual) the geometry, profile, width of the bevel, any wire edges ( held at an angle against the light), straightness of the blade etc.

    I suppose in cooking if you are only dependent on yr sight only.. then if the other chef can use all his senses ( 1)eyes, 2)ears ,3)olfactory ( smell) adn 4)taste dn 5) touch.. he wld have a serious serious advantage.

    from my observation, we didn't have a program in school to develop or senses further. Most of it is by chance during our childhood and upbringing and to what we are exposed to. I also noticed that the talented people are heightened in a few of their primary senses.. Hearing, touch and sight. Presumably of which I believe, they are using 3 highly developed input systems and as when compared to a person whose primary mode is just sight (eyes) in everything they do and when they look and do not even see... they wld be miles apart.

    suffice to say that the knife makers needs all three to be highly developed. They need to be creative in solving problems ( do what it takes) too as only when the problem/ challenge is overcomed , the desired outcome wld be attained. YOU can't be doing teh same thing over and over and expect a different result. SOmehting has to be changed adn youn play with the parameters available ( angle, pressure, grits etc)

    I also believe that it shld be applied to all the things that we do for better results/ performance.

    Feel free to pm me. It is a different subject/topic altogether

    as always.. be well and stay sharp
    rgds
    D

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gravy Power View Post
    Thanks to all that have replied. Not that I'm at the point of needing to do this yet, nor have the skill, but how does one go about it? Lowest grit stone?
    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...job?highlight=

    Those kind of jobs are taking little more than 10 minutes.

  9. #29
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    A good sharpener gets the most out of his blade. Ninety percent of it is getting your primary edge keen and basic thinning. The last ten percent (more for thicker knives) is maintaining/modifying the geometry and finish of the knife overall. This part is more subtle and sometimes tricky to accomplish but to me, that is the difference between something I feel like getting rid of and something that gets me hot and bothered every time I pick it up. I'd say, most people that give it a good try get fairly comfortable with getting the primary edge keen and eventually tailor the sharpening to the steel and the purpose. Most of the thinning jobs I've seen are rudimentary at best and leave a lot of performance untapped.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by phan1 View Post
    Honestly, SPEED is a big issue as well. I've worked in some hardcore places where I had to sharpen my knife 3-4 times a day. If it's taking you 10 min to sharpen your knife, something's wrong. Now, I find it annoying if people take 15min + to sharpen their knives (which I'm sure is very common cause that's how long it took me when I was getting started). I know it's fun, but you can't spend all day sharpening your knives man!

    Am I missing something, you need to sharpen three to four times a day? What is causing your edges to fail, so quickly? I take longer then 15 minutes to sharpen, but my edges last weeks if not months, depending upon the knife. In a restaurant, I'd assume the edge would last at least a day, and maybe as long as a week.

    Jay

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