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Resurfacing an Edge Grain
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Thread: Resurfacing an Edge Grain

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    bprescot's Avatar
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    Resurfacing an Edge Grain

    With a new Boardsmith on the way, I wanted to ask about resurfacing my old Boos block edge-grain board. I've read that you can just sand them down, but to get out some of the deeper scarring, would take hours by hand. And I seem to recall others recommending against a belt sander, though the reason eludes me. Since I don't have a planer, does this mean I'm doing this by hand or are there other options?

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    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    Check with a local cabinet maker. I'll bet they'll do it for a few bucks.
    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

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    Still Plays With Blocks
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    Ben, Sanding a board that has been oiled can be a nighmare. The oil in the board will mix with the dust to make a gooey substance. This will require constant cleaning of a belt sander belt. The cleaning can be accomplished with a large eraser stick.

    You can look for a cabinet shop to have it sanded in a wide belt sander but their belt will clog just as fast and not be as easy to clean. You can also use a cabinet scraper to resurface the board. Cabinet scrapers are available at any woodworking shop.

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    The danger with sanding the board is that grit from the paper can become imbedded in the wood. A low angle block plane is a good tool to use for this, but it may be a bit of of stretch for someone not into woodworking!

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    Hey guys,

    Thanks for all the advice. Yeah, I tried using my finishing sander and realized how quickly an oiled board will load sandpaper up. I'll give the scraper's a try, though I've never attempted to use them to remove this much material. I'll post some before and after pics for anyone contemplating doing the same.

    Thanks again!
    Ben

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    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bprescot View Post
    Hey guys,

    Thanks for all the advice. Yeah, I tried using my finishing sander and realized how quickly an oiled board will load sandpaper up. I'll give the scraper's a try, though I've never attempted to use them to remove this much material. I'll post some before and after pics for anyone contemplating doing the same.

    Thanks again!
    Ben
    I have sanded an oiled board with a palm sander. Be prepare to have sheets upon sheets of sandpaper on hand, as it will clog up fast. I would start with 60-80 grit and move up to 150 (80-100-150). You can use a cabinet scraper, but it takes a nicely burnished scraper and a good technique to produce a good result. Try it, and if it doesn't work well, use a palm-sander.

    M

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    Quote Originally Posted by The BoardSMITH View Post
    Ben, Sanding a board that has been oiled can be a nighmare. The oil in the board will mix with the dust to make a gooey substance. This will require constant cleaning of a belt sander belt. The cleaning can be accomplished with a large eraser stick.

    You can look for a cabinet shop to have it sanded in a wide belt sander but their belt will clog just as fast and not be as easy to clean. You can also use a cabinet scraper to resurface the board. Cabinet scrapers are available at any woodworking shop.
    Can you do the salt treatment before hand to reduce the gooeyness of the board?

    k.

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