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  1. #11
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
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    I agree. 5 months and your attempts to alter the knife kind of stick a fork in returns and credits.

  2. #12
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    Yeah, I messed up. I should have checked it sooner or even just given the knife a run on a high grit stone.

    My camera skills are pretty lackluster, but I'll post a pic after dinner.

    Nope, not a moritaka, but it's an artifex. As for whether it can be fixed, who knows. If it can be, it'll need a heckuvalot of grinding. I'll contact them again and see what can be done. I'll keep you guys updated. Thanks for the responses so far.

  3. #13
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    Well here it is.

  4. #14
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    If I was going to pay to fix it, it wouldn't be someone the vendor recommended, especially if it's his name on the knife and he won't at least offer some aid, especially on a type of issue that is known to possibly take time to show.

    I do agree that 5 months may be pushing it, but I would be curious how it would be handled by a maker here that put his name on that blade? The other side is that good money would be on not having this be an issue with any makers here.

    one man gathers what another man spills...

  5. #15
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    I had something similar on a tojiro DP. It is no longer affecting the edge or right behind the edge because of the thinning, so what's the problem, apart from looks?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squilliam View Post
    I had something similar on a tojiro DP. It is no longer affecting the edge or right behind the edge because of the thinning, so what's the problem, apart from looks?
    Based on the picture, from what I can tell, I think the problem is that the divot goes from just above the edge to, potentially, the spine. Consequently, in order to correct the overgrind, the OP has to regrind/thin the entire face of the blade.

    If he sharpens up to where the divot starts without regrinding the entire surface, he'll have a BIG hole in his edge and it'll continue well up the face of the blade.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  7. #17
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    El Pescador's Avatar
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    To truly fix the issue, he'd probably lose most of the tip.
    "So you want to be a vegetarian? Hitler was a vegetarian and look at how he turned out."

  8. #18
    Senior Member cwrightthruya's Avatar
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    But, if he continues thinning as he sharpens, will he not eventually work part of that divot out before the edge ever hits it? It won't fix the problem, but in a home environment it should give him years of use before he ever develops a hole in the edge. My thought is that if he tries grinding that divot out all at once he is going to destroy the geometry of the tip. But, I could be wrong...

    Haha ElPescador beat me to it...
    At Death's Door You Only Have 2 choices. Die Happy or Die Regretfully.
    Knowing this...........Choose 1 and Live!!!!!!!!!

  9. #19


    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    I'm always in for taking a stab at Richmond but in this case I'm not going to be able to. I've seen this type of thing on a whole slew of Japanese knives so I'm not going to be able to point the finger as this being an issue that is only seen on a Richmond knife. Yes it's crappy but not at all uncommon, just ask anyone who's ever laid a knife down on a flat stone and they'll tell you a story.

    As for sending it to his guy, that may actually be a good thing if you can get him to accept liability for any screw ups he causes but if not then you can most certainly do better by blindly picking a name out of a phone book.

    Funny but if this came to me to work on I'd be reluctant to touch it simply because it's setting up the craftsman for failure and no amount of $$ is worth taking the chance of screwing up a customer's knife. I hate to find myself in a position where I'm looked at as the one who screwed upa knife when it was already screwed up to begin with, I was just trying to work a miracle is all.

  10. #20
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    To throw a wrench in the gears, there's another one, nowhere near as bad, towards the heel. Luckily, however, that area is quite beefy.

    I didn't realize that this was that common Dave. Surprising. Looks like I'll be sending MR and SF a long email tonight. Here's to being stuck between a rock and a hard place.

    @ElPescador and mhlee - this is exactly what I'm afraid of. Holes in the edge and losing the tip.

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