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Newish to sharpening, hoping to pass the paper push cut test. - Page 2
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Thread: Newish to sharpening, hoping to pass the paper push cut test.

  1. #11
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    practice. took me a year before i felt like i actually got it right the first pass.

  2. #12
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    Practice! And watching really closely at what you are doing. If you go slowly at first and watch how the angle changes as your stoke moves back and forth you can start to build some muscle memory, your arms have to shift a bit as you go back and forth. Try to keep your wrists steady and move from your hips instead of your arms.
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  3. #13

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    I'm sure that someone will make fun of me for this (and that's ok ) ....but I have watched closely and found that having a wide stance helps (a little wider than shoulder width), with one foot ahead of the other. I'm a lefty so I put my right foot first...helps to keep my body out of the way of my elbow.
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  4. #14
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    Nothing odd about that! A stable base is very important when you want repeatable results!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    I'm sure that someone will make fun of me for this (and that's ok ) ....but I have watched closely and found that having a wide stance helps (a little wider than shoulder width), with one foot ahead of the other. I'm a lefty so I put my right foot first...helps to keep my body out of the way of my elbow.
    Hell that's what I do even when I'm just cutting food. Absolutely in agreement with Spike; a solid stance is nothing to mock.

  6. #16
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    You may be rounding the edge on that belt. Try a proper felt or leather stropping base loaded with diamond ftw.
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  7. #17
    Senior Member kungpao's Avatar
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    I've posted in many forums but this one has to be the most efficient and helpful one I've had the pleasure of dealing with.

  8. #18
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    The best tip that I've gotten for beginning sharpening, was to avoid using too much pressure on the stone. If you're pressing down, then the drag of the knife will drag your angle up and down as you sharpen, build up muscle memory sharpening very lightly.

  9. #19
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    I think if you start off with a pretty high angle it should be much easier to get it consistent when you're starting off

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty View Post
    The best tip that I've gotten for beginning sharpening, was to avoid using too much pressure on the stone. If you're pressing down, then the drag of the knife will drag your angle up and down as you sharpen, build up muscle memory sharpening very lightly.

    i disagree here i think pressure is misunderstood in sharpening. I have found using a bit of pressure speeds up sharpening, also knowing when to use lighter pressure helps as well. On course stones i will use mild pressure and on finer stones i use more pressure and lighten as i finish it.

    just my .02 maybe others will comment as well

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