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Thread: Q's on Arkansas Stones.....

  1. #11

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squilliam View Post
    Also I don't think they can cut hard or complex steels, at all.
    In a practical sense, I think that's right.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    In a practical sense, I think that's right.
    If by "in a practical sense" you mean slowly, I agree. Arkansas stones are capable of sharpening plane irons and chisels that are harder than most kitchen knives. The steel composition is not a factor.

    That said, I much prefer waterstones.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squilliam View Post
    Also I don't think they can cut hard or complex steels, at all.
    Yes they can.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    If by "in a practical sense" you mean slowly, I agree.
    Precisely what I meant.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    If by "in a practical sense" you mean slowly, I agree. Arkansas stones are capable of sharpening plane irons and chisels that are harder than most kitchen knives. The steel composition is not a factor.

    That said, I much prefer waterstones.
    Exactly right,I have alot of my Fathers chisels he used as a pattern & model maker for NASA.He also built wooden boats,also have a few of my Grandfathers boat chisels.All sharpened on Arkansas oil stones.

  6. #16
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    I'd question steel composition not being a factor as that's what contributes to wear resistance AFAIK. Having larger amounts of carbides (in the 80 HRC range) would likely have some impact.
    With chisels and plane irons you can safely exert a much greater amount of pressure than with a knife, which may make them more usable. Not sure they are necessarily harder than knives either, my vintage ones and modern versions are around 60 HRC as far as I can tell (Addis, Ward, Sorby, Lie Nielsen, Hock etc).

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TB_London View Post
    I'd question steel composition not being a factor as that's what contributes to wear resistance AFAIK. Having larger amounts of carbides (in the 80 HRC range) would likely have some impact.
    With chisels and plane irons you can safely exert a much greater amount of pressure than with a knife, which may make them more usable. Not sure they are necessarily harder than knives either, my vintage ones and modern versions are around 60 HRC as far as I can tell (Addis, Ward, Sorby, Lie Nielsen, Hock etc).
    Steel composition may affect the rate at which the knife can be sharpened, but it does not result in Arkansas stones being unusable for these steels, which is the comment I was referencing.

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    I'm only speaking from what I recall from my time on bladeforums, with people having plenty of trouble sharpening their high alloy knives. I think some of the carbides are harder than the arkansas stone and are not going to be abraded properly as the stones have an equivalent Rockwell hardness of Rc 69.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squilliam View Post
    I'm only speaking from what I recall from my time on bladeforums, with people having plenty of trouble sharpening their high alloy knives. I think some of the carbides are harder than the arkansas stone and are not going to be abraded properly as the stones have an equivalent Rockwell hardness of Rc 69.
    As to the anecdotal reports on Bladeforums, I have no doubt that there were reports of difficulty using Arkansas stones, as anyone used to the speed of waterstones might mistakenly conclude that the Arkansas stone wasn't working. Much the same thing happens with a person new to hard Japanese naturals.

  10. #20
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    I have a old washita stone that works great on all of my knives. It's convenient sometimes to just pull out the old oil stone and not fuss with the mess and or setup of water stones. The washita is a "soft" Arkansas but its a finer grit and cuts faster then other soft's. trouble is they have been "mined out" for the past 25 years or so. If you can find a old norton "Lily White" that's a good one. Trouble with the old Arkansas stones is that they were usually cut small 6" and shorter. A old norton tri-hone washita would be the only longer one that I can think of that might pop up somewhere?

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