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Thread: New Kitchen. Which Range?

  1. #11
    We have a Garland in the country. That thing is probably 40-50 years old and still going strong. I'm not even sure they still make them, but if they do it might be worth a look.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member markenki's Avatar
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    What range hood CFM numbers should one be looking for in a home kitchen? I have no idea what the CFM numbers translate to in real terms, so even ballpark estimates would be great. Thanks.

  3. #13

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Mine is 1500CFM, which is the volume of air in a room that has an 8' ceiling and is 14' square. That much air is moved through the hood every minute. This is pretty close to the volume of air in my kitchen, actually.

    The typical home hood is about 300-600CFM. Not sure what the restaurant models do.

    one other big different between home and restaurant models is the actual size of the hood...mine is slightly smaller than my cooktop, so some smoke/vapor escapes around the sides...this would be much less of an issue with the commercial models.

    OTOH, if I was selling in 10 years, I wouldn't make that investment either..and agree it would probably be a liability when reselling the house.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dream Burls View Post
    We have a Garland in the country. That thing is probably 40-50 years old and still going strong. I'm not even sure they still make them, but if they do it might be worth a look.
    Garland spun off the 'residential grade' part of the operation; that is Bluestar now. What is great about the Bluestar range is it uses Garland parts, so it can be serviced by commercial pros and you are not limited to typical residential appliance repair companies (which tend to not be as honest or inexpensive on the whole as the commercial guys).
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    Mine is 1500CFM, which is the volume of air in a room that has an 8' ceiling and is 14' square. That much air is moved through the hood every minute. This is pretty close to the volume of air in my kitchen, actually.

    The typical home hood is about 300-600CFM. Not sure what the restaurant models do.

    one other big different between home and restaurant models is the actual size of the hood...mine is slightly smaller than my cooktop, so some smoke/vapor escapes around the sides...this would be much less of an issue with the commercial models.
    We installed a 42 inch wide Vent-A-Hood above our 36 inch Bluestar. I think the hood vents about 1,800 cfm when both blowers are turned on high. This is barely adequate, as our smoke alarm (about 20 feet away) goes off on a regular basis when we sear or use a grill pan -- and that is with us cracking a window nearby for make-up air (make-up air is a must for minimizing smoke alarm events). A 48 inch wide hood would have been better.
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  6. #16
    Lower your bid 50k and throw in a Molteni or Bonnet!

  7. #17
    Watching this thread closely.

    I went through this with my current house, and the insulation and power requirements for a commercial range made it more hassle than it was worth. I ended up just going consumer grade, but I'm moving to a new house, too -- and this time I'll go higher end. Fortunately, I'll need a cooktop only, so it'll be a bit simpler/cheaper.

  8. #18
    Mano,

    What induction unit did you go with? Would you go induction again?

    Quote Originally Posted by mano View Post
    A friend builds luxury condos and after years of complaints about Viking ranges he switched to Wolfe, but I'm not sure about the price. Most of the people I know with super high-end ranges say they have lots of problems. I've heard good things about Capital Culinarian, though.

    We went induction even though it meant replacing 75% of our cookware. IMO, it's better than gas, but I don't know who makes a 36" induction range.

  9. #19
    Got an Electrolux, which is phenomenal. High heat is as good or better than gas, low is perfect for stocks and more than enough digital increments. It has a "perfect turkey" oven setting that cooked it about as good mine, which took me years of trial and error. Lots of bells and whistles that are actually useful.

    Consumer Reports loves induction but gave the Electrolux a 73 because of the small oven (it has a second drawer oven at the bottom). IIRC, GE, Kenmore and Sanyo all got scores in the 90's. I think Electrolux make the Kenmore range.
    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough." —Mark Twain

  10. #20
    I agree with Z - definitely get baffles that are dishwashable.

    Also, 600 CFM is the bare minimum in my opinion for any higher end residential range. I have a Windster that's rated at 650. I wish mine were stronger. I've experienced the same issue as WildBoar when using a grill pan.

    Most commercial-style ranges have a dedicated simmer burner. Personally, I think they're pointless. Most burners now have a simmer setting so a dedicated simmer burner is unnecessary. A

    36 inch ranges should all be able to hold full size baking sheets. I would just verify this. Some, not all, 30 inch ranges do. (My DCS doesn't. Full size baking sheets don't fit.)

    Range grates. I would recommend getting ones that don't require rubber feet, if you can find a model that doesn't have them. DCS/Fisher Paykel charges something like $30 for like 12.

    Burners. I personally look for and prefer burners where the electrode is not completely exposed. If they are, a messy spill can destroy the electrode; although they're not expensive, they're not cheap to replace. For my DCS, last time I had to deal with it, it was about $120. I would find out how much maintenance the models you're considering require. Although the burners are likely all technically considered "sealed", some burners have multiple parts that can get gunked up.
    Michael
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