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Thread: New Kitchen. Which Range?

  1. #31
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    bprescot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkmk View Post
    I know how hard it is to be in limbo like that, and to start mapping out a new home.
    Haha. No worries. We hadn't moved in in our minds or anything. We just did some back of the envelope calculations and drawings and sketches to make sure that we COULD remodel the kitchen it into something we'd like. If we couldn't figure out how to do that, or if the $$ estimate had been way too much, we wouldn't have put in the offer. The wife is a bit upset, but I had kinda anticipated this result, as the seller bought the place in '07 I think, for WAY more than his listing price. And we can in significantly under listing due to what comparable homes in the are have sold for... It would have been nice if things had worked out, but we're not taking it too hard or anything.

    Thanks though! It's appreciated.

  2. #32
    Sounds like a good approach. I'm probably especially attuned to the anxiety this can all cause, because my wife and I are getting ready to close on a new place 1200 miles away. This house was our first choice, and we've got it under contract -- but still we'll sleep better once it's all signed, sealed, and delivered.


    Quote Originally Posted by bprescot View Post
    That's a brilliant friggin' idea! Well even if we don't have to remodel something right away, I think I'm heading down to the Bluestar showroom nearby anyway. Can't hurt to be prepared, right?
    That's the spirit!

    ;-)

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkmk View Post
    we've got it under contract -- but still we'll sleep better once it's all signed, sealed, and delivered.
    GOOD LUCK!!! It sounds like you found a really exciting one. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you that all goes well (and I'm sure it will). Keep us posted!

    -Ben

  4. #34
    If I put a 1/2" gas pipe on my South Bend I could up the BTU output greatly, but I only really need that when I chow. That said - that's why they put a volume knob on the things.

    I can't take my range with me when we move out back so I'm thinking two induction tops and two LP burners + 1 oven - probably electric w/convection option it depends.

  5. #35
    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    I've had a Viking for 12 years now. Nothing but good things to say. 99% of the complaints for any of the commercial style products come from the ignition system and the modules in nearly all of these brands are made by the same company.
    BS is not owned by Garland, never was and does not use Garland parts. BS bought out the rights to the design when Garlands home division went out of business. BS is using a Garland burner clone. That's where the similarity ends. Take a good look at their service network in relation to where you live before you buy one if a warranty is important to you. Don't get sucked into the 22k burner hoopla. In a residence your gas flow is restricted by line size so the actual working difference between a 15K and 22K residential burner is not nearly as much as one might get led to believe. Even less if you use propane. The biggest difference with BS compared to many other commercial style ranges is they use a star burner (If you want to see the difference between BS and Garland look at the manifolds) but that comes with a trade off of getting 22k burner(s) and a dedicated simmer burner so some might feel there's less flexibility.
    The bottom line on Wolf, Viking or BS is that these products are designed with out all the electronic crud (aside from the ignition). As long as you can turn a screwdriver and have a base mechanical background there's really nothing a homeowner can't repair cheaply and with ease on any of these aside from a gas valve. Pick the brand you like best, look at scratch and dent sales if you want to save some $$$
    In regards to commercial ranges at home, at least in the US in most places they will void your homeowners insurance policy as they do not conform to residential building codes. If you have a true commercial range in your home make sure it's listed on your insurance policy.

    Dave

  6. #36
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    <shrug> The BS/ Garland info was actually on BS's web site a half-dozen or more years back. Maybe I misinterpreted what they were stating, although I remember reading it on some other appliance sites as well. But in the end the key is the lack of electronic, other then the actual ignitions. The simplicity is what is so good about the BS to me. Some of the ranges out there today have electronic control panels, which make your range a large paperweight when they crap out, and replacement is often 1/2 the cost of a new unit. There is a noticeable difference between the 22k burners and the others on our stove. Besides the additional BTUs (can't verify if it is truly a full 22k) there are twice as many gas holes so slightly better flame coverage.
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

  7. #37
    I recently bought a house that came with a gas stove, but no hood. I'm considering picking up this one: http://www.kitchenhoods.ca/range-hoo...unt-p-220.html

    Anyone see any problems with it, or have any thoughts on alternatives I might not have looked at?

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