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Thread: First Japanese Knife Recommendations

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Since you're at Edwards, if you can make it to LA, I highly recommend stopping by Jon's shop (Japanese Knife Imports) in Venice.

    I don't think this has been asked, but do you require a stainless steel knife? The Hiromoto has a carbon steel core so it will stain and possibly rust if left wet or if it's not cleaned or wiped down after it's been used.

    And, for what it's worth, I don't think a petty knife and a parer are redundant. Do you use a petty in hand, i.e., gripping the entire handle with your thumb on the blade? I think it's difficult to do the in hand cutting that you can do with a parer with a 150 petty, e.g., using a 150 petty to core strawberries or tomatoes is different than using a parer. I do, however, think that a petty knife and a boning knife are essentially redundant (I often use a 120 petty to debone chicken).

    I've used a 210 Gesshin Kagero. I would choose it over a Hiromoto. It's made of tougher steel and will hold its edge longer than the Hiromoto. The fit and finish of the knife is better than the Hiromoto - the handle is nicer, the spine and choil (the vertical part of the knife that is perpendicular to the handle) are rounded. It's also well balanced for a western handled knife.

    I see your point about the paring vs petty. I hadnt thought of that. I do do a lot of in hand stuff like coring tomatoes, strawberries as well as peeling fruits and potatoes. I didn't have a peeler growing up so to me, it's faster to peel a potato or apple with a knife than a peeler.

    It's not imperative that I get a boning, paring or petty at this moment. I do have the Wusthofs and those pieces aren't clunky as the chefs knife.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    Im curious what "in hand" stuff youre doing. Do you really need a boning knife?
    I do a lot of peeling with a paring knife. I prefer it over a peeler for fruits and potatoes. I don't really need a boning knife. I've been using my 6" utility to break down and debone chicken as well as butterflying them. The most important piece I want is a new chefs knife. Every time I break out the beast I dread it and I really enjoy cooking, just not prep work with that knife.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by keithsaltydog View Post
    You will use the 210 Gyuto the most,if you can afford it get a premium blade like the Gesshin Kagero,esp. if you like the looks of it.A 120 or 150 petty comes in handy too.Suisin Inox around 69.95 for 120mm.You can debone wt. a petty as long as you go thru the joints,not trying to cut bone.If you order a knife fr. Jon at JKI call him,his online knife sharpening tutorals will get you started.
    That is where I planned on getting it from. Thanks! I'll need to learn how to sharpen so the tutorials would be great. Any recommendations for the stones? Also, I have a wusthof honing rod. Will I need a different one for the Gesshin?

  4. #14
    Likely won't need to use a honing rod at all...take in the videos and learn how to strop and you will be fine. I like the idea of spending most of the cash on a good gyuto and a few stones. I agree that it may be best to wait until you have a chance to get down to Venice so you can actually handle a few knives and see what feels best; if you keep your mind opened to it you may wind up with a 240 as the J-blades tend to be more nimble when compared to comparable size Euro's. Your parer is likely just fine for now and if you want a boner, I too would recommend a Forschner (mine is curved)--cheap and functional.

    Cheers!
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Likely won't need to use a honing rod at all...take in the videos and learn how to strop and you will be fine. I like the idea of spending most of the cash on a good gyuto and a few stones. I agree that it may be best to wait until you have a chance to get down to Venice so you can actually handle a few knives and see what feels best; if you keep your mind opened to it you may wind up with a 240 as the J-blades tend to be more nimble when compared to comparable size Euro's. Your parer is likely just fine for now and if you want a boner, I too would recommend a Forschner (mine is curved)--cheap and functional.

    Cheers!
    I found the Forschner 6" boning knife on clearance for $12.99. Thanks!

    I'd LOVE to go to LA and see all the knives, my problem is 2 kids under 2 that can barely stand the car ride into town let alone a 3 hour drive there lol. Not to mention, we live in military housing so my space is extremely limited. I have a 15x19 board that takes up every bit of available counter space so a bigger knife might make it a bit tricky to cut on the board.

    Besides, I know I won't be in this house anymore than 4 more years and it would give me an excuse to upgrade if I wanted to later

  6. #16
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    Erilyn you can pick up a Bester 1200 stone for about 49.00.It is a very good Med. stone at a fair price.Even wt. just the bester you will not need the steel rod for home use.Once your blade is trained a quick touch up on the stone works best.Steels work for softer knives like your German blades.The trouble wt. steels is incorrect use which can easy round your edge & also over steeling can fatige the metal.Polishing steels or smooth ceramics I have found work in a production Kit.,Learning to freehand on whetstones is the Key.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by keithsaltydog View Post
    Erilyn you can pick up a Bester 1200 stone for about 49.00.It is a very good Med. stone at a fair price.Even wt. just the bester you will not need the steel rod for home use.Once your blade is trained a quick touch up on the stone works best.Steels work for softer knives like your German blades.The trouble wt. steels is incorrect use which can easy round your edge & also over steeling can fatige the metal.Polishing steels or smooth ceramics I have found work in a production Kit.,Learning to freehand on whetstones is the Key.

    Thank you, I look for that as well. It's an expensive purchase so I want to make sure it's taken care of.

    Another question, I was reading Jon's Gesshin intro thread and he mentioned he wouldn't recommend rocking with this knife. I mince a lot of garlic, herbs and onions by keeping my left hand on the tip and rocking the blade back and forth. Can I still do that with this knife or is there a different technique I should learn?

    You all are very helpful. Thank you!

  8. #18
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    I love the Kagero suggestion, that knife feels great in hand. I still have a crush on the 210 gyuto. It should be suggested more really, but this does sound like a perfect application.

    Yes, you can mince garlic and herb by rocking no problem. Onion maybe not so much.

    Call Jon at JKI, he will take care of you. He carries some of the best stones around as well.

    Oh, and welcome!
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  9. #19
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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  10. #20
    That's for the info. I think I will give him a call once my little terrors take a nap lol.

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