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Thread: First Japanese Knife Recommendations

  1. #21
    I would recommend the Misono 440, I purchased a set for good friends of mine for their wedding and they love them. I sharpen them once every 6 months and they are very easy to get hair popping sharp on the stones. They also feel good on the stones, which isn't always true of stainless steels. They are also very thin so they slice through anything and the fit and finish is very nice.

    If you want to try carbon steel, then I would look starting with a Fujiwara FKH 210mm. They are very cheap but they take a very nice edge, stay sharp (certainly much longer than any German steel) and you won't feel terrible about messing up a $75 dollar knife. The Fujiwara was my first Japanese Knife and I still use it all the time.
    Twitter: @PeterDaEater

  2. #22
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Also, the misono moly 210mm is only $90 at JCK. I liked my 440 back in the day, but honestly i would probably prefer the moly due to it being a lighter, perhaps even thinner knife. Those misono moly paring knives and pettys are pretty inexpensive now too....

  3. #23
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    A paring knife is a cheap fix.Even the Forschner works well.A forum member turned me on to the Opinel Carbone,they are thin cheap & get very sharp.Use mine for coring strawberries to cutting pork chops & steaks.I noticed Opinel had their Inox paring knives on sale too.

    As mentioned you can debone wt. a petty,however it is a matter of preference,I used boning knives at work,it is a good design suited for it's purpose & the one you picked up should serve you well.

  4. #24
    I've been watching YouTube videos to see techniques used with Japanese knives and someone deboned a whole chicken with a petty in under 3 minutes. It was impressive lol. I also watched one by saltydog (is that you Keith?) making short order of an onion.

    The thing that kinda scares me about the Gesshin is the very thin tip. It's a big investment and I'm scared ill break it trying to learn how to use it over the Germans. I'm wondering if I should maybe start with a less expensive knife to learn with and then later on venture to LA to go knife shopping. I'm glad I have a husband that indulges my love of kitchen accessories because looking at some of the sexy knives on this site, it could turn into an addiction lol.

  5. #25
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erilyn75 View Post
    I've been watching YouTube videos to see techniques used with Japanese knives and someone deboned a whole chicken with a petty in under 3 minutes. It was impressive lol. I also watched one by saltydog (is that you Keith?) making short order of an onion.

    The thing that kinda scares me about the Gesshin is the very thin tip. It's a big investment and I'm scared ill break it trying to learn how to use it over the Germans. I'm wondering if I should maybe start with a less expensive knife to learn with and then later on venture to LA to go knife shopping. I'm glad I have a husband that indulges my love of kitchen accessories because looking at some of the sexy knives on this site, it could turn into an addiction lol.
    Saltydog is.... Saltydog on here. Good job guessing he's a member. A lot of the decent knife technique vids do come frome users actually, check out YouTube user PCCkitchen (goes by Theory around here) for some great ones.

    Your concerns for the Gesshin are unfounded, the Kagero is fairly sturdy, but even if it were a laser there would be no reason to be concerned. It's very unlikely you will break it. Even snapped tips can be fixed with amount too much ado. (just send them to Jon, lol)

    It is an addiction, run now before we infect you.
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by wenus2 View Post
    Saltydog is.... Saltydog on here. Good job guessing he's a member. A lot of the decent knife technique vids do come frome users actually, check out YouTube user PCCkitchen (goes by Theory around here) for some great ones.

    Your concerns for the Gesshin are unfounded, the Kagero is fairly sturdy, but even if it were a laser there would be no reason to be concerned. It's very unlikely you will break it. Even snapped tips can be fixed with amount too much ado. (just send them to Jon, lol)

    It is an addiction, run now before we infect you.
    Ill check those out tonight after the babies go to bed and my mind is free.

    I was looking at Pierre Ridrigue's website last night and his knives are beautiful. I could totally see myself with one in the future lol. My husband thought I was a little nuts getting excited over knives but I quickly reminded him of his Star Wars Lego obsession

  7. #27
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with Pierre's blades, but perhaps it's better first to find out your own preferences about profile, geometry, material, weight, balance and perhaps fine tuning your technique. A middle of the road basic J-knife may be a better introduction.

  8. #28
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    Nope the original Salty wt. video.We both worked kit. many yrs.I'm retired now,but staying busy teaching at the culinary school here.Thats why I like to push freehand sharpening it's not gender related at all.my sister & niece I taught.Also a large % of culinary students are female & quite capable of mastering freehand tech.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by keithsaltydog View Post
    Nope the original Salty wt. video.We both worked kit. many yrs.I'm retired now,but staying busy teaching at the culinary school here.Thats why I like to push freehand sharpening it's not gender related at all.my sister & niece I taught.Also a large % of culinary students are female & quite capable of mastering freehand tech.

    I would have loved to have gone to culinary school but I didn't develop my passion for food and cooking until my mid 20s when we were stationed in England. Two British chefs opened my eyes to the wonderful world of yummies lol. Then we moved to Okinawa and it was just amazing. Watching the sushi chefs in action and the habatchi chefs putting on their shows was fascinating. One even taught me how to make curry soup.

    I've always wanted to learn the ways of sharpening knives but The Lord blessed me late in life with 2 more babies 15 months apart. It's never ending chaos around here right now but things are starting to mellow out some as they are getting older which will give me some much needed "me" time to play with knives lol.

  10. #30
    The Misono UX10 Santoku is a nice Japanese knife. A little on the pricey side though, for a knife.



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    Best of luck on your search

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