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Thread: Coffee, Extraction, Beans

  1. #1

    Coffee, Extraction, Beans

    So what are you using to get your favorite black gold.

    I am using a Behmor Brazen at home and a Aeropress at work.

    Mostly buy beans from Transcend, Social, and 49th Parallel here in Canada and have a small shop in Medicine Hat that has some beans I enjoy.


    If money was no object I would love to add a semi automatic espresso maker to my counter top

  2. #2
    I use a hottop and rancilio sylvie and rocky. Beans mostly from sweet marias so far.

    So far its been great, but I wouldnt mind it if the machine could roast more than 1/2 lb per batch.

    Check out the hottop website, they have didactics on roasting science that I found instructive.

  3. #3
    I really would like to take the coffee to another level and start buying green beans and playing with roasting. Buying roasted beans from vendors makes it hard to keep fresh beans on hand. I am not ready to try some of the roasting methods Sweet Marias talk about such as stove top and using an air popper for popcorn.

    When I bought my burr grinder I suspected I would not be able to make the jump to an espresso machine (financially) so I never worried about getting a burr grinder that would do a really good job for espresso. I am just using a Baratza Encore.

    What beans are you really liking from Sweet Marias?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Get the sampler from SM. A nice variety of beans.

    To start roasting a stainless saute pan and camping gas cooker will do for a start. Results won't be half bad if you are careful and likely better than many roasted beans you buy.



  5. #5

    Exact Science

    Clayton neat pic.

    Another reason I have avoided doing some home roasting is the assumption that it is very hard to reproduce results when using home roasting methods. And trying to maintain consistency and get a true flavor profile from the beans. Like many things it is a learning process I am sure, just like sharpening a knife.

  6. #6
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    It is an easy way to get started and will cost you very little. Keep stirring and listening and it will likely turn out well. You will learn about cracks in the process and will likely feel very good about yourself.

    If you like peaty scotch try it over the camp fire sometime.

  7. #7
    I am more of lighter roast type of person and I would be shooting for City or City+ depending on the bean. I do like a smokey profile in some of the darker roasts but it has to be in conjunction with other flavors and notes.

  8. #8
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    I've been roasting for 6 years, have an extensive espresso and coffee set-up(s). Sounds like you have a good set-up, no need to change. If you do get a semi-auto, you need to pay closer attention to the grinder.
    Jason

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by AFKitchenknivesguy View Post
    I've been roasting for 6 years, have an extensive espresso and coffee set-up(s). Sounds like you have a good set-up, no need to change. If you do get a semi-auto, you need to pay closer attention to the grinder.
    Yeah, for pure espresso I figured my Baratza Encore would certainly be the weak link. Would the Rancilio Silvia v3 be the best introductory bang for the buck semi auto machine?

  10. #10
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    How do you like that Brazen?
    I'm have a technivorm for auto-drip, but truthfully I use my vac pot 85% of the time. I just enjoy the zen like process of making it.
    Currently I've got a Baratza Vario for grinding drip and a Mazzer SJ for 'spro, eyeballing a Mahlkonig Guatemala upgrade for drip though. When I make ice drip I need to grind a whole bag at once, the Baratza doesn't like it and it takes forever.

    I hadn't considered the Silvia a "bang-for-the-buck" machine since v3 had the big price bump (650), they are a solid machine but all that value talk was when they cost $400 then $500. They lost a lot of market share following that price bump, as such the v3 is actually gone down a little ($639 Most places, make sure shipping is included), while everything also has continued to climb. They are competitive again I think. Even still, I would rather give the Crossland CC1 a go at that price. Though, double boiler wins hands down if you can manage it.
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

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