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Adventures in handle and saya contruction by hand - Page 2
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Thread: Adventures in handle and saya contruction by hand

  1. #11
    Senior Member Line cooked's Avatar
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    I am a total newb too this, but I did a saya with very inexpensive 1/4 chisel I picked up at Home Depot and a very inexpensive piece of Basswood... It worked but I struggled with the piece when I reached the point where I needed to hollow out the tip. Partly because I have no chisel experience, but more because the handle begins to get in the way...I have considered investing a few more bucks and purchasing a cranked or offset chisel, but not sure if that even makes sense....ANY pointers would be appreciated

  2. #12
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    Just picked up some new belts, 80 and 120 grit and some hand sandpaper, 320 and 600 grit. as well as some extra fine steel wool. Anyone work with m3 mokume before? what's the best way to polish? This stuff is very light. Here are two handles rough shaped with the rough (REALLY ROUGH lol) cut mokume... I was going to do a ferrule, spacer and end cap with the 1/8 mokume I got... but I'm not sure about the spacer now... Honestly I dont want to cut the wood. I'm excited about the figuring and grain on this wood. it looks great and I dampened one of them and I get some lovely orange hues as well as some grey. very dynamic. I am probably going to restabilize them tonight. I did it before without creating a vacuum and it was a waste of time, this wood is fragile.



  3. #13
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Nice pics, thanks for showing. M3 is relatively easy to work with. It really benefits from high polishing, I go up to at least 2000 grit with that material. They usually include a small probe of their polishing compound. If you don't have that, a fine car polish will work also for the final touch. It really has most of the metal characteristics and responds well to polishing. Buffing also works great, but it leaves a black metal residue on the buffing wheel, so you may want to set aside one wheel for that stuff only.

    HTH,

    Stefan

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by apicius9 View Post
    Nice pics, thanks for showing. M3 is relatively easy to work with. It really benefits from high polishing, I go up to at least 2000 grit with that material. They usually include a small probe of their polishing compound. If you don't have that, a fine car polish will work also for the final touch. It really has most of the metal characteristics and responds well to polishing. Buffing also works great, but it leaves a black metal residue on the buffing wheel, so you may want to set aside one wheel for that stuff only.
    I dont have a buffing wheel. Only a cordless drill, a dremel, and my hands... They did give me a sample of their buffing compound, How can I use this without a buffing wheel?
    Thanks for the tips!

  5. #15
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnxiousCowboy View Post
    I dont have a buffing wheel. Only a cordless drill, a dremel, and my hands... They did give me a sample of their buffing compound, How can I use this without a buffing wheel?
    Thanks for the tips!
    Just sand to the highest sandpaper you get. You can use an old piece of cotton to rub it down with the buffing compound and then a clean piece of cotton to polish it by hand, it will not quite shine like real metal but almost.

    Stefan

  6. #16
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    How are you planning on getting the hole for the tang of the knife into the handle?

  7. #17
    Senior Member Potato42's Avatar
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    Nice project! I don't know how I missed it until today. I especially like that you're matching the wood for the saya with the handle from the same block. Looking forward to more.
    - Sean

  8. #18
    Senior Member Line cooked's Avatar
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    Super interested to see the finished product neighbor

  9. #19
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Have you done the buffing yet? If not, you can get one of those little headlight polishing kits for your cordless drill and try some soapy water on it (or go dry).
    I recently had the same issue and I rigged something up, that is essentially the headlight kit (minus the compound). One thing to be careful of, is the compound getting stuck and almost buffed into any incongruities in the wood grain.
    Hopefully my little trial and error will help you out a bit. I'm looking forward to seeing how this all turns out.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  10. #20
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnxiousCowboy View Post
    ...

    How do you guys hollow out the saya? I was going to dremel it, but my dremel is as old as I am and it just seems like a bad idea in general. I was thinking about chiseling, but I have no chisels or chiseling experience... File that **** and hand sand I suppose?
    There are special chisels for carving sayas but not everybody is interested in spending $140 on one. I never found dremmel, a hand router and other mechanical devices for chip removal very appealing. You will spend a lot of time guessing. Chisels are the way to go. If you plan on making a few more down the road, get a proper chisel.

    Never tried M3, so can't comment. However, shaping wester style handle is done best when the handle is mounted on the knife and blade is secured in a vice (you can have two pieces of wood lining the jaws). I find round files and semi round rasps work best for shaping a handle and then hand blending and hand sanding. There is some information online how to do it. Sounds like a great project. Good luck.

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