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Thread: Rehandle Vid

  1. #21
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    Thanks for sharing that video Rick. That is one of the more enjoyable knife videos i've seen in a long time: I think mostly because it covers really well something I've wanted to do for a long time and haven't gotten to yet - and the knives look great.

  2. #22
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobinW View Post
    How do you put the finishing o nhte wood? It's gotta be above 320 grit right?

    I used 1200 grit wet/dry on a handle from Stefan and i had to break out sub micron polishing paste and after that a felt wheel on a dremel to get even close to his finish...
    I take the belt grinder from 60 grit up to 320 then hand sanding from 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, 2000 then I drop back down to 1500 on the micromesh pad and progress to 12000 grit. Then I finish by simply hand buffing with mineral oil then a quick mineral oil buff on the grinder with the felt belt. Stefan finishes entirely different. I'm not sure what he uses, he told me once long ago but I forgot. I'd like to seal my handles better and I think his finishing technique may be what's needed.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  3. #23
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Usually, I only sandup to 1200 grit, only very few woods benefit from going higher if I later use compounds for buffing them anyway. I apply a mix of tung oil and shellac, the number of layers depends on the wood and my mood, rubbing them down with steel wool between layers. The stabilized wood doesn't need the finish, but I find the oil lets the wood colors pop out a bit more. Buffing with white and pink compounds, then by hand with a cotton cloth.

    Stefan

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by apicius9 View Post
    Usually, I only sandup to 1200 grit, only very few woods benefit from going higher if I later use compounds for buffing them anyway. I apply a mix of tung oil and shellac, the number of layers depends on the wood and my mood, rubbing them down with steel wool between layers. The stabilized wood doesn't need the finish, but I find the oil lets the wood colors pop out a bit more. Buffing with white and pink compounds, then by hand with a cotton cloth.

    Stefan
    What is your ratio of tung oil to shellac? I did a wa handle with several layers of shellac trying to combat the stupid humidity here, but I don't really like the feeling.

  5. #25
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    I use about 50:50. The shellac mostly works as an accelerant for the tung oil to dry. Bark River Knives uses boiled linseed oil instead of tung oil, same idea.

    Stefan

  6. #26
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    Thanks Rick,good to see your process.Your idea of using grid lines flattening scales will try it.What surface are you using to flatten the scale.When I trace out the scale on the wood,I cut the scale close to the line first,that way not so much time on the sander.You must be using Carbide drill bits to go thru the tang.

    Been using Stephens 50/50 mix,it pops out the wood & buffs up nice.

  7. #27
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Thanks! The sandpaper is wrapped around a diamond plate but only because I don't have a wide enough belt or a disk grinder which would be a ton easier. I've done it the other way as well on my first rehandle where I roughed out the shape prior to fitting. That time I also glued the liner to the scale prior to fitting as well. Next time I think I should drill a few extra holes in the tang just so more epoxy can create a stronger total bond. Don't know why I didn't remember that prior to gluing.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  8. #28
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    Thanks,I have had trouble trying to level on my sander(no disk)edges feather which makes it worse.I would rather do it by hand been using a 60 grit on flat surface & a small carpenter square.Deff. going wt. your grid lines next handle,see how that works.Nice clamps on your drill press.I picked a cheap Ryobe drill press at Home Depot.I think some of the carbide bits I bought to drill thu the tang for 5/16 center mosaic pin & 1/4 screw pins(bought several of each fr. Drill Bit Warehouse) in total cost almost as much as the cheap drillpress.

    I am kind of learning this as I go along,figuring it out on my own,so it's nice to get a tip,one of these days I'll post some pics of my open air garage mini shop.I have to keep things covered up wt. thick garbage bags as it's been raining alot lately.

  9. #29
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    thank you very much for the video, very interesting and skillful.

  10. #30
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Thank you, I appreciate that. Still learning as I go.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

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