Quantcast
forced patina on shigefusa?
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: forced patina on shigefusa?

  1. #1
    Senior Member pkjames's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    236

    forced patina on shigefusa?

    Hi fellow knifenuts,

    Being a lurker here for a long time and this is my first thread! Excited!

    I have been using Japanese kitchen knifes for a while now and most of my previous purchases are stainless blades. After reading so much on how go the carbon blades are, and taking the low exchange rate on yen, I recently jumped onto the boat of carbon knives and bought a few shigefusa knifes.

    I know that shigs are quite reactive, so I just want to put a forced patina on to the blades before start seriously using them.
    I kinda like those even blue / purple patina and was wondering if you have any good suggestion on what would be the best way to put them on.

    Ive read methods like Darkhoeks' blog on putting patina on shigs (chicken / mustard) ; and the warm blood method from the patina thread; and even fresh coconut! Just not really sure which way will result in the most even blue / purple patina.

    So, yeah, hope you guys can shed light on this, some pic would help to!

    Cheers,
    James

    Some pics of the shigs! One more deba on the way!




  2. #2

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC AKA The Queen City! The lint-filled belly button of the south.
    Posts
    2,593
    Really, really, really knice set of knives! That kamagata usuba is my fav!
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Isle of Lucy
    Posts
    1,616
    Prepare yourself for wailing and gnashing of the teeth from the purists!

    I put a mustard finish on my ajikiri and have been really happy with it--enough that I'm planning to do my gyuto in my copious spare time. Didn't get a lot of blue, but there is some blue when the light hits it right--more of a silvery/grey textured effect. Knife doesn't stink so much now when used.




    Name:  ShigMustard2.jpg
Views: 56
Size:  13.3 KB

    Name:  ShigMustard3.jpg
Views: 53
Size:  13.1 KB
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  4. #4
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,127
    I realize how weird this is going to sound, but here goes: when you're in the mood for the blues, nothing works like covering your blade with warm blood.

    Haha. Wow, that was strange...seriously, warm cow blood.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jmadams13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    995
    What lefty said. Was playing around with patinas the other week, so I saved the blood from a shoulder I broke down, and I warmed it up on the stove, then painted it on with a paint brush. The blues were amazing. Ive since polished that blade, so no pics, but warm blood is the best way to go for blues.

    You could just cut some warm rare beef.
    "This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.. Beer!" -Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves, Friar Tuck

  6. #6
    Wonderful knives. You've bought 3 of them?

    Lucretia - your ajikiri is nicely done!

    My shig gyuto was quite reactive at first, but after using it a bit - I actually tried to keep the patina off, later sharpening, thinning, polishing, etc - actually it didn't take that long, but I'd say that soon enough it wasn'tt very reactive at all. I don't know about others' experiences, but it only seemed reactive initially like many knives do. Therefore, I'd say maybe you don' t have to worry about forced patinas and reactivity if you don't want. You could try, or go and try the patina and polish it later if you don' t like it. Iizuka-san would probably prefer patina-less though

  7. #7
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    3,894
    Given that you'll be using the yanagiba on proteins, and therefore won't need to worry about reactivity, I would keep it patina-free. If you're not cutting reactive food with the usuba, I'd keep it patina-free, also. Just scrub them with a cloth and baking soda.

    For killing reactivity on the gyuto, the hot vinegar/mustard method on Darkhoek's blog is the best I've used, but it's not a bluish/purplish patina that you seem to want, so you may want to take Lefty's advice. You could always use Lucretia's method and then slice hot meat with it to add some color.

  8. #8
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,127
    Great points, Rick! Also, the more layers, the better.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Chef Niloc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Long island NY
    Posts
    1,088
    I like the patina that red bell peppers bring out. If a knife is very reactive just cutting a few will do the trick. If not letting the blade sit covered with slices works.

  10. #10
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,127
    Dammit, more traffic from me. Sorry!

    Colin, it's funny you mention red bell peppers, because they are something my wife and I eat every day, whether they be in salads, sautÚs, with dip, caramelized, etc. As a result, I know if a knife needs more patina based on the smell I get from cutting them. I also know a knife needs a touch up when it doesn't fall through the skin, or cut the stem cleanly in half.

    *Fun fact (or, from what I've read, a fact): Red bell peppers have three times the vitamin c of an orange and are considered a super food, because of their anti-oxidant properties and huge vitamin content.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •